The Architecture of Simplicity: A Concern for Light and Quiet Shape Cistercian Monasteries and Spirituality

By Fox, Thomas C. | National Catholic Reporter, January 26, 2007 | Go to article overview

The Architecture of Simplicity: A Concern for Light and Quiet Shape Cistercian Monasteries and Spirituality


Fox, Thomas C., National Catholic Reporter


NCR: Who are the Cistercians and how do they fit into the Catholic monastic tradition?

Kinder: There have always been Christians who didn't want to live the normal life, raising a family and working. In southern Italy during the sixth century, St. Benedict lived as a hermit in a cave. Admiring his wisdom and lifestyle, others came, wanting to be his disciples. That happens with hermits. He welcomed them and in the end wrote a rule because he knew that when you live in community, you need rules about what, where, when and how you're going to live.

He went on to found a monastery, Monte Cassino, and ever since this Rule of St. Benedict has been lived out in monasteries around the world.

In 1098, a group of Benedictine monks decided they wanted to get back to the original rule that had been amended and added to over the centuries. They felt their abbey had become too worldly and wealthy. This first Cistercian monastery was called the "New" Monastery. The name Citeau, from which "Cistercian" comes from, came 20 years later. It was a back-to-the-sources kind of movement. We have had these throughout history with religious orders. They wanted to live a much simpler life than was being lived in most monasteries at the time.

How did you come to study Cistertian architecture?

On my way to medical school at Syracuse University, I took a course in Gothic architecture. The university had inherited a gift of 10,000 slides of Cistercian monasteries. When an art professor saw them, she put together a seminar. What struck me powerfully then at the dawn of my career was the uncluttered design of the buildings, the harmonious proportions, and the subtle play of light--all important components of Cistercian architecture. I was awed by the simplicity, the lack of clutter, the harmonious proportions and the absence of ornate art.

When you ask why they didn't have such art, you must look at it from the point of view of a monk or nun. If you want a simple life, you have to be free of clutter; the ambience that surrounds you is key. There isn't anything that happens in a Cistercian monastery that doesn't happen to us as well. Winston Churchill observed once that we build buildings, then buildings build us. Simply put, we are formed by our surroundings.

Benedict's Rule has a chapter on silence. It reminds monks that silence is not just about hearing but is visual as well. If you have to too much overload, then you can't focus well. The Rule's prologue says: "Listen, my son." We live in a talk culture, but if you're talking all the time you can't listen. The idea of being quiet and listening to the abbot, the teachers, the officers in charge of farm and work is ultimately about listening to God, so Cistercian buildings are visually quiet. It's a counter statement to our culture where we must keep ourselves constantly stirred up and entertained, blunting our ability to listen to the wind rustling in the leaves--or to God.

Cistercian architecture is about light as well. When you come into a monastery in the middle of night for service, it's animated by candles. At Lauds, the first light of day pierces the gloom, then a few hours later the sun is up through the east windows. As you come back throughout the day, you have seen how the light is changing all the time. It's not just the sun moving across the sky but also the reflections of snow in winter or the softer light of overcast day.

There's a lot of subtlety inside a monastery. It takes a while when you visit to slow down and begin seeing it. Cistercians don't want to be distracted, because they are after a deeper place within. We live in a culture that is dominated by sound, light, advertising, movement, color. Ironically, though, when people now visit these abbeys, they often just sit with tears in their eyes, finding a kind of renewal. There are few places anymore that offer something we need badly.

The strict monastic rules about not owning things, not accepting gifts, are not to make the monks unhappy; they are helps to polish the mirror, as images of God. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Architecture of Simplicity: A Concern for Light and Quiet Shape Cistercian Monasteries and Spirituality
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.