Iraq Casualties Display Raises Red Flag for Some

The Register Guard (Eugene, OR), January 26, 2007 | Go to article overview

Iraq Casualties Display Raises Red Flag for Some


Byline: GUEST VIEWPOINT By Shannon Smyth For The Register-Guard

A Jan. 22 Register-Guard article described the Iraq war display created this week at the University of Oregon. Three thousand small, red flags were planted in a grassy area of the UO campus, each one representing an American serviceman or woman killed in Iraq. White flags, more than 120,000 of them, covered a large area, each one standing for six or seven of the Iraqis killed since the war began.

I would like to add a war veteran's viewpoint.

I hope the organizers of this project intended to create a visual representation of something that is merely a concept in the minds of most UO students. If so, then I applaud the planning and presentation. As this project was created in such a large scale, nearly all students and faculty on campus were able to take in the numbers of flags, which represented death in large proportions.

As a veteran of Afghanistan and Iraq, I respect the fact that the U.S. soldiers who have died in both theaters were represented. I also respected that there were signs noting that both soldiers and civilians have been killed in Iraq.

As a former war-fighter, and as a protester of the Iraq war, it is good to see civilians contribute to acts that promote peace. These efforts promote progressive thinking and, hopefully, peace.

While I respected and appreciated most aspects of this display, I questioned its psychological effects on veterans on campus - people who have been involved in combat against many of the people represented by the white flags (those of which represent dead Iraqis).

The white flags represent people who tried to kill many of the veterans who saw this display. Many of these flags represent people who have been killed by these veterans in self-defense.

The red flags, representing dead American soldiers, are faces, friends and family to many of the veterans on campus. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Iraq Casualties Display Raises Red Flag for Some
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.