Pulp Fiction

By Cunneen, Joseph | National Catholic Reporter, November 18, 1994 | Go to article overview

Pulp Fiction


Cunneen, Joseph, National Catholic Reporter


The advance hype for Quentin Tarantino's Pulp Fiction was fueled by its best-film award at Cannes last April. That honor was deliciously ironic at a time when the French, defending their beleaguered film industry against the mass invasion of U.S. movies, were denouncing the exploitative violence and meaninglessness of which "Pulp Fiction" is a prime example.

Tarantino's title is accurate: If you don't normally seek out pulp fiction as a means of recreation, there's no reason to spend your money on a movie version, even if it's tricked out with a complex plot that doubles back on itself and adopts a hip stance toward its gangster materials. Those attending out of hoopla-generated curiosity will nevertheless receive massive jolts of energy that had the audience I saw it with charged up and cheering.

A high school dropout who got a liberal education working for years in a video store -- where he obviously watched hundreds of movies with considerable intelligence -- Tarantino has made a movie movie, full of insider jokes, bright stage design and about nothing at all.

More than one critic has called Tarantino fascist but this seems unfair; even if his directorial technique is overbearing, he obviously likes actors, and gets fine performances from Samuel L. Jackson, John Travolta, Bruce Willis and Harvey Keitel, among others. Although many will be offended by the repetitive violence and crude language, the audience is cued in the opening sequence that "it's only a movie."

An effete couple in a diner, Honey Bunny (Amanda Plummer) and Pumpkin (Tim Roth), after some desultory chatter, stand up and announce, with mincing theatricality, that it's a holdup. The comic riffs of the gangsters, which usually hold up the action and deal with such subjects as foot massages and foreign naryies for hamburgers, have no connection with the world of film noir but would make superior sequences for "Saturday Night Live. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Pulp Fiction
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.