From the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

Occupational Hazards, February 2007 | Go to article overview

From the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)


From the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)--www.osha.gov--comes word that it has revised its directive on the National Emphasis Program on Amputations to identify and reduce workplace machinery and equipment hazards that cause or are likely to cause amputations.

Changes include (1) identification of industries and establishments associated with amputations rather than equipment; (2) lists of typical machinery and equipment associated with amputations; (3) incorporation of a comparison chart for the Standard Industrial Classification codes and the North American Industry Classification System codes; (4) new targeting methodology based on more current data from OSHA and Bureau of Labor Statistics sources, and (5) the Control of Hazardous Energy (Lockout/Tagout) and Mechanical Power-transmission Apparatus standards related to amputation hazards.

Also, OSHA has unveiled new safety and health guidance that alerts employees and employers about the hazards of occupational exposure to avian influenza from infected birds, and provides practical recommendations on ways to avoid infection. The new document, which is available in English and Spanish from OSHA's web site, updates guidance that the agency issued in 2004. The primary focus is on good hygiene, including use of gloves and hand washing, as well as respiratory protection for those who work with infected animals or people.

In addition, OSHA has issued a direct final rule that incorporates more recent National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) standards into OSHA's fire protection standard for shipyards. The rule adds 10 updated NFPA standards and requires employers to use the more recent versions.

New OSHA communications products include:

* Safety and Health Topics Page that Makes the Business Case for Safety and Health. This page contains direct links to resources showing the costs of workplace injuries and illnesses, economic benefits of workplace safety and health, and how accounting for employee safety in the design stage of a project can result in fewer injuries and illnesses and increased productivity. It also includes success stories, case studies and tools for getting started on improving safety and health in the workplace. …

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