It Could Have Been Me: Anita Roddick on Rebiya Kadeer; A Businesswoman Once Celebrated by the Chinese Authorities Was Forced to Flee to the US Because She Stood Up for Human Rights. Now Her Children Are Being Persecuted

By Roddick, Anita | New Statesman (1996), January 29, 2007 | Go to article overview

It Could Have Been Me: Anita Roddick on Rebiya Kadeer; A Businesswoman Once Celebrated by the Chinese Authorities Was Forced to Flee to the US Because She Stood Up for Human Rights. Now Her Children Are Being Persecuted


Roddick, Anita, New Statesman (1996)


Like me, Rebiya Kadeer is a businesswoman and a mother. Like me, she has a passionate interest in human rights and in the power of activism to change things.

Unlike me, Rebiya's career was based in China. And unlike me, she was harassed, then imprisoned for nearly six years. On her release, she has continued her activism from exile in the US. But the authorities back home have intensified their attacks on her sons and daughters.

Rebiya is a member of China's Uighur ethnic minority, who are predominantly Muslim. The authorities stepped up their persecution of Uighurs in the aftermath of 9/11. Mosques have been closed down, clergy detained, and Uighur books banned and their authors jailed. Freedom of expression and association have been severely restricted and thousands of people imprisoned across the region.

From 1997, Rebiya Kadeer suffered police harassment and travel restrictions due both to her husband's activism outside China as well as her own human-rights work on behalf of the Uighur people, such as forming the "Thousand Mothers' Movement" to encourage Uighur women to run their own businesses.

She was detained on 11 August 1999 in the Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region while trying to meet an American research group. Three weeks later, she was charged with "illegally offering state secrets across the border", which related to sending publicly available newspaper articles to her husband, who lives in the US.

Rebiya was released from prison in March 2005 on medical parole. While in custody she was warned that if she engaged with members of the Uighur community, or spoke publicly about "sensitive issues" after her release, her "businesses and children would be finished". Her sons were detained on charges of tax evasion and "subversion".

Defiant, Rebiya was elected president of the World Uighur Congress. Later the same day, her son Ablikim was reportedly beaten so badly while in detention that he was carried out of Tianshan District detention centre on a stretcher. Amnesty believes his health is in danger, and that he is at risk of further torture or ill-treatment. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

It Could Have Been Me: Anita Roddick on Rebiya Kadeer; A Businesswoman Once Celebrated by the Chinese Authorities Was Forced to Flee to the US Because She Stood Up for Human Rights. Now Her Children Are Being Persecuted
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.