Sponsoring the Revolution: Illegal Immigrants Are Pawns in a Game Aimed at Fomenting Revolution and Funded by the Nation's Major Tax-Exempt Foundations

By Behreandt, Dennis | The New American, February 19, 2007 | Go to article overview

Sponsoring the Revolution: Illegal Immigrants Are Pawns in a Game Aimed at Fomenting Revolution and Funded by the Nation's Major Tax-Exempt Foundations


Behreandt, Dennis, The New American


April 10, 2006: In the streets of Dallas, Texas, a human tidal wave surged through the streets. The immense crowd carrying the Mexican flag and placards featuring the likeness of Cuban Marxist terrorist Che Guevara--estimated to be at least 100,000 strong, with other estimates running as high as 500,000 --shuffled at times and surged at other times toward city hall, yelling insults and throwing bottles of water at those few counter-protestors brave enough to confront the seething throng. The counter-protestors quickly evaporated when police indicated they couldn't guarantee their safety in the face of the hostile demonstrators.

The scene was the same in countless cities around the country. One of the largest protest rallies, organized to pressure the federal government to allow unrestrained immigration from Mexico, was held, predictably, in Los Angeles. There at least 500,000 people poured into the streets. Of them, 25,000 were students released from Los Angeles public schools in order to take part in the demonstration--with the school district providing busses to haul the students back to the schools when the protests ended. In Los Angeles, as elsewhere that day, the protestors carried banners: "We are indigenous!" read one, "The ONLY owners of this continent!" Another: "If you think i'm 'illegal' because i'm a Mexican learn the true history because i'm in my HOMELAND." Another: "CHICANO POWER!" And another: "THIS IS STOLEN LAND!" The placards were often accompanied by the communist trademark clenched fist salute and sometimes, reportedly, with the burning of the American flag.

The demonstrations, which called for open borders and the return of the southwest states to Mexico, were organized by a number of radical groups, with one of the primary sponsors being LULAC, the League of United Latin American Citizens. But the demonstrations were large enough, and widespread enough, that they were more than the work of just one special-interest pressure group. Joining LULAC were the Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALDEF), the National Council of La Raza (NCLR), the Movimiento Estudiantil Chicano de Aztlan (MEChA), and numerous other left-wing radical organizations, including the Communist Party USA, which played up the demonstrations in its newspaper, the People's Weekly World.

The size of the April 10 demonstrations, and their national coordination, hints at the existence of a massive organizational structure pulling the strings behind the scenes. The lifeblood of such an infrastructure is money, and lots of it. In fact, it turns out that the radical Hispanic groups that orchestrated the marches are not the grass-roots groups they seem to be. Instead, they are funded, and in some cases were created, by money flowing from pedigreed "establishment" sources, primarily the large tax-exempt charitable foundations, like the Ford Foundation and others. The debt these radical organizations owe to the foundations, and the extent that they are, in fact, creatures of these foundations, was admitted by Henry Santiestevan, former head of the Southwest Council of La Raza, the forerunner to the present NCLR. "It can be said," Santiestevan admitted, "that without the Ford Foundation's commitment to a strategy of national and local institution-building, the Chicano movement would have withered away in many areas."

Funding Revolution

The Ford Foundation has a long history of funding efforts to subvert national sovereignty and to foment unrest in the interest of pursuing internationalist goals in the United States and abroad. Even Congress took notice during the Eisenhower administration and included the Ford Foundation's activities in its investigation of tax-exempt foundations.

The attention from Congress had little effect on the activities of these foundations. The Ford Foundation, until recently the largest of the tax-exempt foundations, for its part got serious about forming and funding Chicano pressure groups in the late 1960s. …

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