Greenhouse Effect Is a Myth, Say Scientists; (and Flares from the Sun Are Really Behind Global Warming)

Daily Mail (London), March 5, 2007 | Go to article overview

Greenhouse Effect Is a Myth, Say Scientists; (and Flares from the Sun Are Really Behind Global Warming)


Byline: JULIE WHELDON

RESEARCH said to prove that greenhouse gases cause climate change has been condemned as a sham by scientists.

A United Nations report earlier this year said humans are very likely to be to blame for global warming and there is ' virtually no doubt' it is linked to man's use of fossil fuels.

But other climate experts say there is little scientific evidence to support the theory.

In fact global warming could be caused by increased solar activity such as the massive eruption seen on the right - captured by the SOHO satellite.

Their argument will be outlined on Channel 4 this Thursday at 9pm in a programme called The Great Global Warming Swindle. It raises major questions about some of the evidence used for global warming.

Ice core samples from Antarctica have been used as proof of how warming over the centuries has been accompanied by raised carbon dioxide levels.

But Professor Ian Clark, an expert in palaeoclimatology from the University of Ottawa, claims that warmer periods of the Earth's history came around 800 years before rises in CO2 levels.

The programme highlights how, after the Second World War, there was a huge surge in carbon dioxide emissions, yet global temperatures fell for four decades after 1940.

The UN report by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change was published in February.

At the time it was promoted as being backed by more than 2,000 of the world's leading scientists.

But Professor Paul Reiter, of the Pasteur Institute in Paris, said it was a 'sham' given that this list included the names of scientists who disagreed with its findings.

Professor Reiter, a malaria expert, said his name was removed from an assessment only when he threatened legal action against the panel. …

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