The VA 'Model'; to Improve Care, Let Veterans Choose

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 12, 2007 | Go to article overview

The VA 'Model'; to Improve Care, Let Veterans Choose


Byline: Robert Goldberg, SPECIAL TO THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Recently, John Stossel of ABC had lunch with Sen. Hillary Clinton. Mr. Stossel writes that when he launched into one of his usual libertarian rants about free markets, Mrs. Clinton cited the VA as an example of government success. Indeed, under her husband's administration, the Veterans Health Administration came to provide the "best care anywhere," according to the Washington Monthly. It was clear in the Monthly piece and in Mrs. Clinton's other remarks about the glories of the VA health-care system that it was a model for expanding coverage to all Americans. Similarly, Democrats and the media could not contain their enthusiasm for the way the VA doled out drugs at bargain-basement prices as an alternative to the current Medicare drug benefit.

Democrats beat a strategic retreat from imposing restrictions on access to medicines that veterans deal with when it became clear that seniors valued freedom of choice. Mrs. Clinton might want to reconsider her recent depiction of the VA as a medical paradise she created in light of growing dissatisfaction and poor treatment of the mental-health needs of the members of the armed forces returning from Iraq. We know accepting responsibility is too much to ask.

The VA is having a hard time handling all the most common battle-related injuries: traumatic brain injury and post-traumatic-stress disorder. It is not a matter of lack of funding or staffing or compassion. It is a matter of trying to do what a single-payer government system does anywhere in the world: force as much of the treatment of specialized care of complex and chronic illnesses down to the primary care doctor in order to hold down costs.

The VA system has made much of the fact that some of its outpatient centers outperformed commercial managed-care organizations on certain process measures (screening for diabetes and diabetes-related illnesses, checking cholesterol levels) more than seven years ago. And no one should dispute that the VA has made strides to improve the ability to follow patients through the system, something that makes it easier to reduce errors and improve care.

But there are simple measures for judging the quality of care. If you need care, you get it when you need it. If you're sick, when you get treatment you get better. Finally, what is done is based on total well-being and for the long haul, not to meet a short-term budget goal. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

The VA 'Model'; to Improve Care, Let Veterans Choose
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.