Mood and Stress May Influence HIV Progression

By Kirn, Timothy F. | Clinical Psychiatry News, February 2007 | Go to article overview

Mood and Stress May Influence HIV Progression


Kirn, Timothy F., Clinical Psychiatry News


SAN FRANCISCO -- Depression and stress appear to be important considerations in the treatment of HIV-infected patients, Dr. Frederick Hecht said at a meeting on HIV management sponsored by the University of California, San Francisco.

Although research on the topic is not conclusive, available evidence suggests that being able to experience positive emotions may protect somewhat against CD4 cell count loss, he said.

And, in a small pilot study of yoga practice, he obtained intriguing, but not definitive, evidence that there might be ways to mitigate depression and response to stress.

The first studies associating depression with CD4 cell loss, published in 1993, were not entirely convincing, said Dr. Hecht, research director of the UCSF Os-her Center for Integrative Medicine.

Subsequent studies have suggested that it is not depression per se that is associated with rapid HIV disease progression, and that negative affective symptoms have little or no impact on HIV progression.

Instead these studies have shown that positive affect--the ability to experience positive thoughts and emotions, and enjoy some aspects of life, even despite sadness--can have a large effect, Dr. Hecht said.

One study, the San Francisco Men's Health Study, included 407 HIV-positive men followed over 10 years.

The relative risk of AIDS mortality was 0.89 in those who scored highly on positive affect. Negative affect, however, had little relationship. (Psychosom. Med. 2003:65:620-66).

In another study, of 82 HIV-positive men followed an average 5 years, stress was associated with risk of progression. One major stressful event in a 6-month period, such as the dissolution of an intimate relationship or loss of a loved one, doubled the risk of progression.

Studies by researchers at the University of California, Los Angeles, have hinted at how mood and affect might be tied to the immune system in the setting of HIV. That research suggests that the connection might be through the CCR5 receptor, the major coreceptor of HIV on CD4 cells. Persons who have rapidly progressing disease may have more CCR5 receptors, and the researchers have shown that neurotransmitters such as norepinephrine can increase receptor expression in vitro. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Mood and Stress May Influence HIV Progression
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.