Sector Insight: Menswear - Value in Vogue

Marketing, March 14, 2007 | Go to article overview

Sector Insight: Menswear - Value in Vogue


The growth of value retail means menswear revenues have not kept pace with volume sales.

THE BACKGROUND

When it comes to UK consumers parting with their hard-earned cash, there are some stark differences between men and women. Clothes do not feature high on many men's list of priorities: they are happier to splash out on entertainment and high-tech consumer goods. The menswear market is therefore a highly competitive one. Recently it has seen volumes increase, but value growth has not matched it as the value end of the market has boomed. Last year it was worth pounds 9.2bn, up 13% since 2001. Volume growth over the same period was 31%, according to Mintel.

The value end of the menswear market - which includes retailers such as Primark and Matalan - experienced share growth of 13.5% in 2006, while supermarkets' share increased to 9.9% (up 6.3% compared with 2001).

Asda and Tesco have been particularly forthright in the market, expanding their ranges and proving especially effective in appealing to women who buy clothes on behalf of their family and partners.

Maureen Hinton, senior research analyst at retail specialist Verdict, says: 'Men like using supermarkets as it is easier and non-gender-specific. When there is a downturn in the economy they are also more likely to stop spending on clothes than women.'

The rise of the value stores has had an impact on the mid-market but not necessarily as dramatic as might have been expected. Big retailers including Marks & Spencer, Debenhams and River Island have become more competitive by focusing on their core markets - M&S and Debenhams by developing their offer for older and more affluent customers, with the Autograph and Designers collections respectively, while River Island regularly adds trend-tapping new lines to target fashion-hungry consumers in their 20s and 30s.

However, the market has not benefited from rising prices since 1997, according to Mintel, as the result of factors including the rise of the value retailers, a change of consumer attitudes toward cheap clothing and the removal of quotas on the number of low-priced goods entering the EU. 'There has been price deflation for a long time, and it is continuing, but menswear has lagged behind womenswear in going down the value path,' says Hinton.

The biggest spenders in this market are fashion-conscious pre-/no-family shoppers, according to TGI. This group, comprising mostly 15- to 24-year-old ABs, is drawn to the specialist multiples and strong brands that create clearly defined personalities such as Diesel, G-Star and Ben Sherman. London has the highest proportion of high spenders.

The recent trend appears to be toward smarter dressing: suit-buying rose 2% from 2002-2006. Although the dress code for most workplaces has moved to being slightly less formal, it appears that men now like to dress up more to go out.

The large proportion of sales in this market made to women is especially evident in the 25-plus age range. As a result, stores that cater for both sexes are doing well. Online retailers are also in a good position to exploit men's reluctance to shop as the less-involved buying process will appeal to them. While many high-street stores have built an online presence, online specialists including ASOS have carved a niche in offering the latest fashions.

The specialist high-street clothing chains still dominate the market, however. Retailers such as Topman and Burton account for just over 22% of sales.

M&S' menswear sales rose by 9.5% in 2005 as part of its well-documented revival. Last year it rationalised its own-label lines to Autograph, Collezione and Blue Harbour. The latter is now the UK's biggest men's casualwear brand.

On a more specialist note, in January Italian fashion retailer Benetton announced it was developing a branded store to sell only men's clothes. It plans eventually to roll out the store format across Europe. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Sector Insight: Menswear - Value in Vogue
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.