'Salas Boys' in New York

Manila Bulletin, March 15, 2007 | Go to article overview

'Salas Boys' in New York


Byline: Hern. P. Zenarosa

NEW YORK CITY -- Everytime I visit New York which has become rare the past years, it never fails to evoke memories of younger days with friends and associates in government.

We were then on study leave from the Office of the Executive Secretary in Malacanang taking up graduate courses in various universities in the United States.

Our scholarships were arranged and made possible by Executive Secretary Rafael M. Salas, our boss and friend, who dreamt for us a new vista of Philippine governance enlightened by new ideals and egalitarian principles.

We were then called the "Salas Boys."

Our batch in school year 1968-69 included Toti Que, taking up economics at the Pensylvania State University; Leo Quisumbing, master of laws, Cornell University; Jun Factoran, Harvard Law School; Stephen F. Sergio, mass communication, Indiana University; and the late Violie Calvo, master of laws, American University.

I was then taking up graduate studies in public administration at the University of Connecticut and political history at the Trinity College of Hartford.

Those who were ahead of us were Frankie Llaguno, mass communication, Michigan State University; Jimmy Blas, Perla Tano, Mat Defensor, Jun Aguirre, Boy Morales, Joe Molano, Bonie Alentajan, Vic Ramos, Ed Soliman, Pete Villa, Jimmy Yambao, Buddy Garbansos and the late Ed Libid.

Many of them have become Cabinet members under various administrations, justices, ambassadors, and held high govern -- ment positions while others have excelled in the practice of their professions.

New York is memorable to us because twice during our studies, Paeng Salas came here to attend United Nations meetings and he brought us along in all his functions to observe and expose us to the workings of the world body.

Not only that he brought us along to all the biggest libraries and book stores in New York which he knew like the palm of his hand, he also asked us to select titles at his account. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

'Salas Boys' in New York
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.