Can You Weather This Job? Careers in Meteorology

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), March 15, 2007 | Go to article overview

Can You Weather This Job? Careers in Meteorology


What does a career as a meteorologist involve?

Meteorologists study the earth's atmosphere, climate and weather. They collect and interpret data to make short and long-range weather forecasts for use by all kinds of industries including agriculture, aviation, the armed forces and the media.

Their work falls into two main types: forecasting and research.

Forecasting meteorologists collect data by satellite images, radar, remote sensors and weather stations all over the world, as well as measuring air pressure, wind, temperature and humidity. They also apply computer models and scientific principles to make short-and long-range weather forecasts and supply weather data to customers.

Research meteorologists investigate weather patterns and climate change, develop and improve computer forecasting models and apply research findings to practical problems such as predicting floods or how weather affects pollution or the spread of disease.

What personal skills do you need?

You should be interested in science and the environment and have excellent mathematical and computing skills. You need to have an enquiring nature and be able to analyse complex data. Good communication skills are essential.

What training do you need?

You need a first or upper second class degree in meteorology, maths, physics, or a related subject such as environmental science, computer science or electronics.

For some Met Office support meteorologist jobs you may not need a degree, but you must have at least 2 A levels at grade C or above, including maths and/or physics, plus five GCSEs (A-C) including English. …

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