Butler Still Slowed by Knee

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), March 16, 2007 | Go to article overview

Butler Still Slowed by Knee


Byline: John N. Mitchell, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

The good news is an MRI of Caron Butler's nagging left knee came back negative, revealing no structural damage. But the Washington Wizards still don't know why Butler's knee continues to be sore and stiff.

Butler, who missed three games two weeks after playing in the NBA All-Star Game last month, pulled himself from the Wizards' 112-96 rout of the Indiana Pacers in Indianapolis on Wednesday when he realized his sore knee continued to make him a liability rather than an asset.

He suffered the injury in the Wizards' 100-97 loss at Atlanta last week. At the time it didn't seem that big of a deal, and Butler suited up for the next two games a pair of back-to-back, at-the-buzzer losses to New York and Miami.

On Monday, the day after the Miami defeat, Butler did not practice. He made it known the leg continued to bother him and expressed frustration over not being his old self.

"It's just one thing after another," Butler said with his leg iced and receiving electronic stimulation. "First there was the back injury and trying to come back from that and trying to get a rhythm. The second you get a rhythm and start to find the flow you get injured again.

"I've got a lot of stiffness in my leg, but that's how the league works," Butler continued. "I'm trying to grind it out, but if it's not getting better I might have to sit for a while."

The Wizards didn't practice yesterday, but Butler and some other players reported to Verizon Center to receive treatment of nagging injuries, with Butler's being the most prominent. …

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