Organizational Culture: Its Importance in Performance Measurement

By Grifel, Stuart S. | Public Management, September 1994 | Go to article overview

Organizational Culture: Its Importance in Performance Measurement


Grifel, Stuart S., Public Management


Local governments define the success of their performance measurement systems in different ways. For some local governments, success means developing a few measures and reporting them annually within the budget. For other local governments, success means that performance measurement is an integral part of the organization's management and budgetary decision-making systems.

Uses of the Data

There are three levels of uses for performance measurement data. The first level, accountability reporting by the local government to the public that it serves, is an important use of such data. Recent literature, however, recognizes the fact that merely collecting and reporting data is not enough, and that a system's value over time will be defined in terms of management and improvement of operations, the second level.

A performance measurement system can generate a great deal of information, but to justify its cost, the information must be used. Collecting and reporting alone become a meaningless exercise over time, with the result that the measurement system eventually falls into disuse and fades away. The difficulty that many local governments face is not in developing appropriate and reliable program performance measures but in integrating them into the management and operational decision-making systems of the organization.

Level three, using measurement data for budgetary decision making and allocation of resources, is especially difficult Few jurisdictions have been able to make this linkage successfully. Often, they have used performance measurement data to manage resources at the program level and for financial reporting, but not to exert a substantial influence on the allocation of resources. It is not easy to design systems that appropriately link the measurable goals and objectives of programs with their results and then link the results to budgeting and financial reporting.

Performance measurement should be used as a management tool before the attempt is made to use it as a budgeting or evaluation tool. Management should be comfortable with using performance measurement to augment the normal decision-making process before using it for other purposes.

Organizational Change

Implementing a performance measurement system means change for an organization. The change can be as limited as merely presenting data annually in the budget document or as pervasive as affecting every aspect of an organization's management, budget, and reward system.

Moving beyond a system that reports measurement data only for accountability purposes calls for an organizational environment that accepts change. For change to occur in an organization, managers must create or seek favorable conditions for it. Creating this climate will require that the organization first build an awareness that change is needed and then gain the support of the people who must implement and cooperate with the change.

A System to Fit the Local Government Situation

Government managers need to assess all aspects of their local situation that may affect the success of a performance measurement system. Performance measurement and other improvement approaches develop differently in different communities, depending on the conditions and problems in the community, the level of interest of its elected officials and managers, the abilities of the staff, and the resources available for improvements (Epstein 1984).

What works, for example, in Sunnyvale, California, with a history steeped in information technology, may not work in your organization's environment. Managers will need to assess their own local situations and tailor systems that will allow them some level of success. If you take the time to assess your local circumstances, you can develop strategies to minimize organizational weaknesses and maximize organizational strengths.

Building a successful system is an incremental and long-term process. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Organizational Culture: Its Importance in Performance Measurement
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.