Teaching Research Integrity in the Field of Counseling

By Wester, Kelly L. | Counselor Education and Supervision, March 2007 | Go to article overview

Teaching Research Integrity in the Field of Counseling


Wester, Kelly L., Counselor Education and Supervision


Little has been done in terms of teaching or writing about research integrity or research ethics in the counseling field. Because of the continual push for research in counseling to maintain evidence-based practices, there is a need for education in the area of research integrity in order for professionals in the counseling field to conduct responsible research. The Office of Research Integrity's 9 areas of responsible conduct of research and the American Counseling Association's code of ethics on research are presented, along with a discussion of ways to teach ethics and provide resources for research integrity in counselor education.

**********

Research integrity has received substantial attention in the biomedical sciences. High-profile cases of research misconduct over the past 20 years have resulted in lost jobs, damaged reputations of prominent scientists, lawsuits against universities, and debarment and/or exclusion from future funding or the ability to serve in advisory capacities to grant organizations (Office of Research Integrity, 2005, 2006). Personal characteristics (e.g., psychological disorders, stress management) and situational factors (e.g., competitive sparring to gain resources, generating grant funding, the pressure to publish, health or family problems, financial difficulties) have been found to be some of the possible causes of research misconduct (Alberts & Shine, 1994; Davis, Riske, & Seaman, 2001; Hatcher, 2005; Woolf, 1981). Eventually, incidents of research misconduct led to administrative regulations designed to promote integrity in research. Institutions receiving research funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) consequently are required to address the responsible conduct of research (RCR) not only by notifying the Office of Research Integrity (ORI; affiliated with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) of alleged RCR violations but also by undertaking educational efforts to acquaint researchers with appropriate standards of research conduct.

Research integrity, by definition, is the "adherence to rules, regulations, guidelines, and commonly accepted professional codes or norms" (ORI, "Areas of Interest," [paragraph]1, 2003) or "possessing and steadfastly adhering to high moral principles and professional standards [in the area of research]" (Steneck, 2006, p. 55). Just as research in other areas, such as the biomedical sciences, has been faced with an examination of its integrity, the integrity of research in the counseling field should also be examined. Research within the field of counseling typically deals with human participants, including clients undergoing mental and emotional distress or experiencing a trauma, crisis, or severe mental health disorder. Thus, at times, counseling clients may be at risk because of researchers' conflicts of interest between client care and outcomes of research, dual relationships (e.g., researcher and counselor), as well as the possibility of releasing confidential client information to accurately report results. In addition to research misconduct or questionable research practices (QRPs, defined as departing from the acceptable practice of the relevant research community; Steneck, 2003) occurring with clients, other transgressions can include--but are not limited to---data fabrication, plagiarism, lack of responsibility of the principal investigator, inappropriate authorship, reporting of inaccurate results, or falsifying data.

Although research misconduct and QRPs of counseling professionals have not been reported publicly or been listed on the ORI's misconduct cases Web page (ORI, 2006), it is possible that irresponsible conduct of research exists. Because of the possible serious consequences that research misconduct could have on others (research participants and clients) and on the counseling field, it is time to take proactive, preemptive action designed to prevent inappropriate research practices. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Teaching Research Integrity in the Field of Counseling
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.