Chinese American Historical Society, Museum, and Organization Caucus

By Dong, Lorraine; Woo, Jeannie | Chinese America: History and Perspectives, Annual 2007 | Go to article overview

Chinese American Historical Society, Museum, and Organization Caucus


Dong, Lorraine, Woo, Jeannie, Chinese America: History and Perspectives


A total of eighteen Chinese American historical societies, museums, and history organizations attended the caucus. Agenda items included issues concerning historical preservation, fundraising, grant writing, and how to make the town and gown connection. Two letters were presented for caucus deliberation and signing. (These letters were mailed to boards of the organizations weeks in advance before the conference.) After some sharing of concerns, representatives from twelve of the organizations signed the joint letter to preserve the Alien Files; it was addressed to US Archivist Alien Weinstein of the National Archives and Records Administration. Representatives from only three organizations signed the joint letter to Roger I. Payne of the US Board of Geographic Names to remove the name of "Chinaman's Arch" in Utah and to replace it with "Chinese Arch." CHSA was responsible for mailing these letters.

The idea of developing an umbrella structure for all the organizations was discussed. Twelve representatives signed up to be part of a "cyberspace" committee to continue the discussion. CHSA Executive Director Sue Lee would initiate the first email. This committee was to determine also which organization would host the next Chinese American Studies conference. At the time, there were four possibilities: Chicago, Los Angeles, New York, and Vancouver.

CAUCUS PARTICIPANTS

Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation (1976) [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]

Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation (AIISF) was founded by community members and descendants of detainees who were committed to preserving the deteriorating immigration station barracks. AIISF is leading the effort to preserve, restore, and interpret the Angel Island Immigration Station, a National Historic landmark, and is promoting educational activities for a greater understanding of Pacific Coast immigration and its role in shaping America's past, present, and future.

Chicago Chinese American Historical Society (2004) [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]

The Chicago Chinese American Historical Society is an organization devoted solely to the study and teaching of Chinese American community history in Chicago and the Midwest.

Chinatown Historical Society of Honolulu (1991)

The Chinatown Historical Society of Honolulu acquires, records, and distributes information about Honolulu's Chinatown. Its primary activity is a weekly walking tour under license with the Chinese Chamber of Commerce and customized tours by arrangement. The Society also publishes articles, makes oral presentations, and is the exclusive distributors of a DVD entitled Hawaii's Chinatown.

Chinese American Council of Sacramento (1988) [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]

The Chinese American Council of Sacramento (CACS) was founded in 1988 by a group of prominent Chinese American community activists. The organization was spearheaded by famous restauranteur Frank Fat. CACS was to be a voice for the Chinese in Sacramento regarding social, cultural, and political issues. It was one of the first organizations of its kind in the Capital. Today, CACS is also heavily involved in historical preservation and charities for underprivileged children.

Chinese American Museum (1986) [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]

The mission of the Chinese American Museum (CAM) is to foster a deeper understanding and appreciation of America's diverse heritage by researching, preserving, and sharing the history, rich cultural legacy, and continuing contributions of Chinese Americans. CAM is located in the historic Garnier Building at the El Pueblo de Los Angeles Historical Monument in downtown Los Angeles. Through exhibitions, educational programs, public programs, and publications, the Museum illuminates the challenges and achievements of Chinese Americans, from the earliest pioneers to the newest immigrants.

Chinese-American Museum of Chicago (2002) [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]

A non-profit organization founded in February 2002, the Chinatown Museum Foundation's mission is to establish and maintain a museum in Chicago's Chinatown for the purpose of promoting exhibitions, education, and research related to Chinese America culture and history in the Midwestern United States. …

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