China, Iran, and Leftist-Islamic Cooperation

By Jochnowitz, George | Midstream, March-April 2007 | Go to article overview

China, Iran, and Leftist-Islamic Cooperation


Jochnowitz, George, Midstream


China Daily is the official English-language newspaper of the People's Republic of China. In the February 15, 2006, edition, there was a special four-page supplement entitled "Iran-China Friendship." This in itself is frightening. The United States and the world are threatened by Iran's nuclear ambitions. What a time for an official Chinese daily to celebrate China's friendship with a nation led by a fanatic, Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, who has called for the destruction of Israel even as he continues to expand his country's nuclear options.

Equally frightening is the content of some of the articles in this special supplement. The first page is devoted to an essay by Farhad Assadi, Iran's Charge d'Affaires assigned to China, who writes, "Iran and China have common and similar views on many regional and international issues." Farhad Assadi does not tell us whether Iran and China agree that America is the Great Satan or that Iran should plan to use its nuclear weapons against Israel.

When I lived in China, in 1984 and again in 1989, I was often told that Chairman Mao had said "Women hold up half the sky." Perhaps the Iranian Embassy in China had this in mind when they contributed an article entitled "Remarkable Social Progress Achieved." Maybe Iran is trying to appeal to China's citizens and leaders. But what they wrote is an outrageous lie: "Iran has witnessed remarkable progress in all aspects of social life: improving social welfare of citizens, emphasis on women's rights, co-existence of different religions, and flourishing arts have made the country a better place in which to live." Emphasis on women's rights? Co-existence of different religions? Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini's victory in 1979 was probably the greatest setback to women's rights in Iran's history. Religious minorities were persecuted as never before. China may not be a free country, but its citizens are surprisingly well-informed. By printing this disinformation, China's leaders are solidifying their alliance with the nation that finances the world's terrorists.

China, which loves capitalism as only a Marxist can love an economic system, trades with both the United States and Iran. Nevertheless, China Daily does not print special supplements praising freedom in America. The newspaper has done something for Iran that a government publication would not do for a democratic country.

In Farhad Assadi's report, we read that "Iran is the second largest economy in the Middle East." There is no reference to the largest economy. Assadi certainly wouldn't want to suggest that Israel should be praised for the size of its economy. China does trade with Israel--money is money--but, needless to say, the subject is not featured in special issues of China Daily.

China has not freed itself from the Marxist-Islamic alliance, which began in 1955 when anti-Zionism became an unquestioned component of Marxist ideology in that country. What happened at that time was the Bandung Conference, held in Indonesia, when a Marxist-Islamic alliance was formed to oppose freedom and Zionism. …

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