UN Report Warns Asian Nations on Global Warming

Manila Bulletin, April 9, 2007 | Go to article overview

UN Report Warns Asian Nations on Global Warming


Byline: ELLALYN B. DE VERA

The United Nations (UN)-organized Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) has warned that Asia is likely to experience drastic flooding, water scarcity, hunger risks, and disease problems in the next years considering the present rate of global warming.

Some of the key findings in the 2nd volume of the IPCC report released last Friday in Brussels, Belgium, said that areas most vulnerable to climate change are small islands, sub-Saharan Africa, Asian mega-deltas, and the Arctic regions.

The second part of the 4th Assessment report mainly dealt on climate change's potential impacts, options for adaptation, and vulnerability of regions in the world.

Based on the report, river flooding, sea level rise, and storm surges will be rampant in Asian megadeltas.

It was also cited in the report that global warming can induce mass extinction of species within 60 to 70 years.

Likewise, the change could increase number of people at risk from water scarcity from tens of millions to billions of Asians by 2050.

The panel also projected that reductions in food production capacity is most pronounced in the poorest parts of the world.

Environmental advocate Greenpeace Southeast Asia campaigns director Von Hernandez said that the Philippines is among the countries most vulnerable to climate change.

He said that aside from recurring typhoons and drought, sea level rise is a major threat to marine ecosystems and to coastal human populations and their livelihoods.

Likewise, Hernandez said climate change will amplify the socio-economic burdens already shouldered by Filipino families, such as hunger and water scarcity, and will worsen the existing disparity of living standards between the rich and the poor.

"Greenpeace has warned that time is nearly out to prevent the dramatic, harmful and dangerous impacts projected to happen in the coming decades. If we fail to act quickly, decisively, and with great vigor, there will soon be nowhere to run and nowhere to hide," he said.

"However, there is still time for an energy revolution that will dramatically transform our energy system, moving toward a carbon-free economy, reducing greenhouse gas emissions to a level that will keep the global average temperature increase well below 2 degrees centigrade, to avoid the most catastrophic impacts," he added.

The Greenpeace campaigner urged the Philippine government to act immediately by choosing an energy development path built on clean and renewable sources of energy, to pave the way for a secure and sustainable future.

World global

population also

on the decline

The animal population around the world is also declining due to global warming.

Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (Pagasa) Climate Data Section chief Lourdes Tibig, in a presentation on Polar Issues and Global Impacts held recently at the PAGASA Science Garden in Diliman, Quezon City, said that due to the melting glaciers and ice sheets, increase in sea level rise, as well as the rise in temperature, the population of the animals around the world is also decreasing. …

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