Website for Welsh Americans Chronicles Civil War Participation

Western Mail (Cardiff, Wales), April 9, 2007 | Go to article overview

Website for Welsh Americans Chronicles Civil War Participation


Byline: By Rhodri Clark Western Mail

The surprising history of Welsh involvement in the American Civil War and a key 19th-century gold rush has been chronicled on a new website. While thousands of Welshmen took up arms during the 1861-65 conflict, only about a dozen fought for the pro-slavery Confederacy according to the Welsh American Index, a site aimed at genealogists and historians.

Its website contains obituaries for, and letters by, more than 1,000 Welsh Americans in the 1860s.

Also included are details of Welsh people who were attracted by the gold rush to British Columbia, Canada.

When the Civil War began, more than 90% of the US's Welsh immigrants lived in the north east.

'The Welsh press in general, and in particular the powerful denominational journals, were emphatically anti-slavery,' says the Welsh American Index.

'As a result, it is possible to identify several thousand Union soldiers as being Welsh - either Welsh-born or Welsh-speaking American-born - but only a dozen or so Welsh soldiers who fought for the Confederacy.

'The Welsh-language press in both Wales and America reported the deaths of dozens of Welsh soldiers during the four years of the Civil War.

'These include obituaries of Welshmen who fell at almost all of the major battles of the conflict - Bull Run, Shiloh, Antietam, Vicksburg, Gettysburg, the Wilderness, Petersburg. Other reports mourn the deaths of Welsh soldiers from their wounds, sometimes several weeks after the actual battle, while many more report deaths from disease.

'Some died as prisoners of war, including in the Confederacy's notorious Andersonville camp.'

One obituary reports the death of a John Jones, originally from Monmouthshire, in August 1864 aged 25.

'He was in many skirmishes, but it appears that there was no bullet cast by the rebels to hurt him, as he often said. Death, however, came to him in another shape. About two months before he breathed his last, he was taken very sick and was placed in a Virginia hospital.'

One of the letters on the website was written in 1862 by John Griffiths, originally from Merthyr Tydfil, and describes in detail recent fighting in Virginia.

'There is no danger where I am, and I expect I will stay where I am for some time, probably until the war is over, which will not be too long to my opinion, for after the rebels are whipped here I think they will be glad to come back into the Union,' he wrote.

'You say that my uncle wants to have me back home; I cannot think what he wants with me; I cannot come now, he is too late, I belong to Uncle Sam for a while yet. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Website for Welsh Americans Chronicles Civil War Participation
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.