Investigation of Dimensions of Social-Emotional Classroom Behavior and School Readiness for Low-Income Urban Preschool Children

By Fantuzzo, John; Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca et al. | School Psychology Review, March 2007 | Go to article overview

Investigation of Dimensions of Social-Emotional Classroom Behavior and School Readiness for Low-Income Urban Preschool Children


Fantuzzo, John, Bulotsky-Shearer, Rebecca, McDermott, Paul A., McWayne, Christine, Frye, Douglas, Perlman, Staci, School Psychology Review


Abstract. The present study identified higher order relationships among teacher assessments of approaches to learning and emotional and behavioral adjustment constructs for low-income urban preschool children. It examined the unique contribution of these dimensions to cognitive and social competencies and risk of poor academic outcomes. Analyses of a large representative sample of urban Head Start children revealed two distinct and reliable higher order dimensions of classroom adjustment behavior: regulated and academically disengaged behavior. Both dimensions contributed unique variance to the prediction of early mathematics ability and general classroom competencies before kindergarten entry, controlling for child demographics. Each dimension also contributed independently to the prediction of academic risk, controlling for child demographics. Implications for practice and policy are discussed.

**********

With the enactment of No Child Left Behind legislation, American public schools are being held accountable to ensure that all children are meeting minimum academic standards by third grade (U.S. Department of Education, 2004). Research has indicated that only 32% of fourth-graders in the United States have met literacy proficiency standards (Reyna, 2005). Furthermore, minority children have disproportionately performed below minimum proficiency standards in both literacy and mathematics (Reyna). By establishing third grade as the point of accountability, the No Child Left Behind legislation affirms the significance of early childhood education and the necessity of effective early identification and intervention.

A large body of empirical literature emphasizes the importance of early childhood intervention. Three National Research Council reports, Eager to Learn (2001), From Neurons to Neighborhoods (2000), and Preventing Reading Difficulties in Young Children (1998), highlight the early childhood years as a critical time for development. Research documents that the competencies young children acquire during these years form the foundation on which they will develop and build future competencies (National Research Council, 2000). Young children exposed to social and biological risk factors are at greater risk for not developing these foundational competencies, placing them at future risk of poor school performance (Sameroff & Fiese, 2000). Furthermore, quality early care and education have been found to promote positive school outcomes, particularly for vulnerable young children living in poverty (Kolker, Osborne, & Schnurer, 2004; Lynch, 2004).

Head Start is our nation's largest federally sponsored early childhood program developed to serve at-risk, vulnerable, young children by promoting school readiness (Zigler, Finn-Stevenson, & Hall, 2002). Informed by a comprehensive, developmental model, Head Start targets eight key domains of development to enhance readiness; these include language development, literacy, mathematics, science, creative arts, physical health, approaches to learning, and social and emotional development (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services [USDHHS], 2003). Historically, Head Start's primary goal was to enhance social competence. In recent years, this has shifted to emphasize cognitive, school readiness skills in conjunction with the No Child Left Behind legislation. This has placed a greater emphasis in Head Start on early reading competencies and other cognitive competency. Early mathematics has been identified as another set of key cognitive readiness competencies for low-income preschool children (Jordan, Huttonlocher, & Levine, 1994; Jordan, Kaplan, Olah, & Locuniak, 2006). This shift has generated concern by many early childhood advocates that the promotion of foundational approaches to learning and social-emotional competencies will be deemphasized in early childhood curriculum and as a result children will be placed at greater risk for poor school adjustment (Raver & Zigler, 2004). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Investigation of Dimensions of Social-Emotional Classroom Behavior and School Readiness for Low-Income Urban Preschool Children
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.