Paul Leventhal, 69, Nuclear Arms Specialist

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), April 12, 2007 | Go to article overview

Paul Leventhal, 69, Nuclear Arms Specialist


Byline: THE WASHINGTON TIMES

Paul Leventhal, 69, nuclear arms specialist

Paul Leventhal, a specialist in nuclear proliferation, died April 10 of skin cancer at his home in Chevy Chase. He was 69.

Mr. Leventhal earned a bachelor's degree in government from Franklin & Marshall College and a master's degree from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism.

Mr. Leventhal founded the Nuclear Control Institute (NCI) in 1981 and served as its president until June 2002.

He directed NCI as a Web-based program that maintains a collection of NCI and Senate papers spanning more than 30 years at the National Security Archive. Mr. Leventhal also wrote five books for the institute.

Mr. Leventhal came to Washington in 1969 as press secretary to Sen. Jacob K. Javits, New York Republican, after a decade of political and investigative reporting for the Cleveland Plain Dealer, the New York Post and Newsday.

In 1970, he took a leave from Mr. Javits' staff to serve as campaign press secretary to Sen. Charles E. Goodell, New York Republican. In l972, he served as congressional correspondent for the National Journal before returning to Capitol Hill to pursue legislative and investigative responsibilities.

Mr. Leventhal also was a research fellow at Harvard University's Program for Science and International Affairs, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution and assistant administrator for policy and planning at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

In the 1980s, Mr. Leventhal organized NCI's International Task Force on Prevention of Nuclear Terrorism. …

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