"Graven Images of a Closed Society:" the Huron Hutterite Colony, 1920s

By Ward, Roy; Lehr, John C. et al. | Manitoba History, February 2007 | Go to article overview

"Graven Images of a Closed Society:" the Huron Hutterite Colony, 1920s


Ward, Roy, Lehr, John C., McGregor, Brian, Manitoba History


Hutterites first settled in Manitoba in 1919 when they abandoned their settlements in South Dakota and moved north to secure land in southern Alberta and in Manitoba close to Winnipeg. As German-speaking Anabaptists and pacifists who practised communal living they had been subjected to persecution after the United States entered the war against Germany in 1917. For their refusal to serve in the United States Army and their reluctance to contribute directly to the prosecution of the war they had their possessions seized and some of their youth imprisoned and killed.

In 1918 members of the Schmiedeleut colonies in South Dakota purchased land in Cartier Municipality, Manitoba, where they established six colonies (James Valley, Huron, Milltown, Bonne Homme, Maxwell and Rosedale) and resumed their former way of life. There are now 106 colonies in Manitoba.

The photographs in this collection, taken by Charles E. M. Ward soon after the Huron colony was established and published here for the first time, are remarkable indeed. Even today many Hutterites refuse to be photographed and cameras are not commonly found on most colonies. Until recently many Hutterites requested that their Manitoba driver's licences not carry their photograph as they felt it contravened the Biblical injunction not to make graven images. Thus, in the 1920s the only cameras likely to be found on a Hutterite colony were those owned by outsiders, most likely to be the "English" teacher, the one outsider who had the opportunity to know the community and who was present on a daily basis. Charles Ward was one such teacher.

To the Hutterites the colony is an arc: a refuge from the pressures of a secular and godless world. Their leaders faced, and still face, a daunting task. They need to embrace the most modern technologies in order to remain competitive in agricultural markets that are increasingly sophisticated and global, while at the same time controlling exposure to popular culture that threatens to erode Hutterite traditional values. That Huron colony had an impressive tractor even in 1924 is not surprising; Hutterites have always eagerly adopted agricultural technology if it does not threaten their beliefs or way of life. Today on most colonies computers are found, they stand alone and Internet access is rare. Similarly, radios and televisions are frowned upon because they are conduits for outside values, but GPS technology, two-way radios, and other gadgets that enhance agricultural productivity have been embraced. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

"Graven Images of a Closed Society:" the Huron Hutterite Colony, 1920s
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.