New and Newly Discovered Periodicals

By Lehman, JoAnne | Feminist Collections: A Quarterly of Women's Studies Resources, Fall 2006 | Go to article overview

New and Newly Discovered Periodicals


Lehman, JoAnne, Feminist Collections: A Quarterly of Women's Studies Resources


GIRLISTIC MAGAZINE: FEMINIST THOUGHT AND CULTURE. 2006-. Founder & Editor: Jaymi Heimbuch, 2880 Santa Maria Way, Suite C-1, #1267, Santa Maria, CA 93454. 4/yr. No ISSN. Subscription: Free; online only (PDF): http://www.girlistic.com/magazine.htm. (Issues examined: Winter 2006 [Premiere Issue]; Spring 2007.)

It's worth mentioning, as a sign of the e-times, how I came across this new periodical. I keep a personal blog on LiveJournal. I'm also a member of a bunch of LiveJournal "communities," including a few feminist- and women's-studies-related ones. Someone with the username girlistic posted a question or comment to one of those communities, and I replied. Then, just out of curiosity, I looked at girlistic's profile and discovered that this user was connected to (and founder of) a whole website, a new online magazine, and a blog separate from the LiveJournal one. Seems to me that founder Jaymi Heimbuch and friends are doing effective grassroots marketing in the digital age. Getting mentioned by other websites and blogs is also an important part of such publicity, and I see that there's a big interview with Heimbuch on the blog Feministing.com (Dec. 2, 2006).

The online magazine, which seeks to be both "up-to-date" and "edgy," calls itself "a blend of refined intellect and raw entertainment. Think: Ms. Magazine and Bitch Magazine have a threesome with Bust Magazine and the result is a bouncing baby Girlistic." Heimbuch is editor, and her partner April Weiland does technical layout, but Girlistic solicits other contributors for much of the content; each of the two issues out so far (54 pages and 50 pages, respectively) has about twenty of them. The magazine puts its content under three main headings: "Features and Interviews," which focused on art and artists in the premiere issue and on women and technology in the second; "Columns" (the one on sex is titled, edgily enough, "That Fucking Feminist"; the more intellectual/theoretical one is called "That Omnipresent Feminist"); and "Girlistic Fixes," which includes film, book, and music reviews, a regular essay called "My Vagina and Me," a short "herstory" of something (so far, the Guerilla Girls and the Pill), a poetry page, a brief article about an activist, and a word puzzle ("Feminist Fun Page"). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

New and Newly Discovered Periodicals
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.