T-YOU; Seek Faith or Reason in Times of Adversity?

The Florida Times Union, April 21, 2007 | Go to article overview

T-YOU; Seek Faith or Reason in Times of Adversity?


In the wake of the Virginia Tech shootings, the Times-Union asked readers: Should people rely on faith - or on themselves - in times of adversity? These are some of the responses:

We are known by our works on Earth. We are responsible for seeing how this tragedy could be prevented in the future. But it is because of my faith in a loving God that I can move beyond the pain and forgive this man ... I can let God guide me as I search for answers that may prevent future tragedies.

Marilyn Clark

Intracoastal West

Whether in times of tragedy or in times of even ordinary problems, I have relied on my own experiences, the values and decision-making processes I was taught, the wisdom and experiences of my wife, family and friends. I have done this for a very good reason. It works. I can then take the information I have and apply it to a future problem or tragedy and, in turn, can point to exactly why I made a future decision.

Richard Kusnierek

Orange Park

I personally don't know what to make of the "power of prayer." I'm not sure if there is a God or if evolution plays a part in mankind. I do believe that prayer gives one an emotional comfort. I don't see anything wrong in that.

L. Bass

St. Augustine

I rely on my faith at all times, and especially in times of adversity. My best example is at the death of my father, whom I dearly loved. In fact, I felt I could not bear the thought of losing him. I went to the Bible and I asked God to give me Scripture. He gave me 2 Corinthians 5, where it says that we get new bodies in heaven, and that we are content to die because we will be at home with God.

Laverne Lancaster

Arlington

The word "faith" is cloaked in deception. When analyzed for its root worth, prayer equates to people talking either to themselves or an imaginary being, which is similar to talking to a wall. Things get done by human intellect and labor. After all the praying is over, people ultimately seek out each other for help in healing tortured minds and rebuilding destroyed resources.

Earl Coggins

Southside

Do you know what really works in times of adversity? It is prayer in times of nonadversity. If you pray daily, your faith increases and you are better able to discern why God permits certain things to happen.

Ted St. Martin

Southside

Religion is a mental disorder. As long as people place their faith in a fictitious character, and not reason, problems will never be solved.

David Purdom

Nahunta, Ga.

Prayer is one of several profound attributes of the Christian's safety and security network. This network is given at conversion and must be maintained through prayer, Scripture, obedience and church attendance: 1.) Whole Armor of God; 2.) Helmet of Salvation; 3.) Sword of the Spirit; 4.) Shield of Faith; 5.) Breastplate of Righteousness; 6.) Belt of Truth; 7.) Feet shod in the Gospel of Peace; and, 8.) Praying always, proactively and reactively.

Pastor George Harvey Jr.

Mount Charity Baptist Church

My theory is that one "should pray and fight." An old war song pretty well sums it up: "Praise the Lord and pass the ammunition." This will pretty well take care of most adversities.

Ted Mayhew

St. Johns County

Why would anyone with the brain to reason possibly believe that prayer to a mythical god would help them out of a threatening situation? Man has survived for eons using their brain and reasoning. If, by luck, a person is saved from a situation, it certainly was not by the grace of some god, but sheer luck. …

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