Both Chinas Suffer from U.S. Double Standard

By Beichman, Arnold | Insight on the News, September 26, 1994 | Go to article overview

Both Chinas Suffer from U.S. Double Standard


Beichman, Arnold, Insight on the News


President Clinton and the Congress live, it seems, by a double standards. There is the moral code that demands establishment of democracy where it does not exist. Thus, the Great Debate rages on about whether to invade and occupy Haiti in order to restore a dubious democracy to that tragic, impoverished land. American soldiers may be lost if an invasion occurs. But no sacrifice is too great to establish democracy.

Then there is the moral code that ignores another island nation on the other side of the world. That country's democratic credentials are sound, its friendship for the United States long proven, its economy is solid. (Its 21 million people have created the 13th-largest trading nation in the world, with an amazing $80 billion in foreign-exchange reserves.) It has a legal multiparty system and honest elections, free trade unions and a free press. Yet few dare openly to support it in the name of the same democratic morality that impels Clinton and Congress to plan an invasion of Haiti.

I am talking about the Republic of China, Taiwan, an outcast in the international community since October 1971 because communist China so decreed -- with the whole-hearted cooperation of the Nixon administration. The question of Taiwan will come before the 49th session of the United Nations General Assembly under the doctrine of universality that once was used to press for communist China's admission to the United Nations. That doctrine argues cogently that U.N. membership should be open to any country regardless of ideology or political orientation.

In July, 12 U.N. members -- Burkina Faso, the Central African Republic, Dominica, the Dominican Republic, Grenada, Nicaragua, Niger, Saint Kitts and Nevis, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, the Solomon Islands and Swaziland -- had the courage to submit a resolution that seeks to create an ad hoc committee to consider "the exceptional situation of the Republic of China on Taiwan ... in accordance with the established model of parallel representation of divided countries at the United Nations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Both Chinas Suffer from U.S. Double Standard
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.