Problem? Just Ban It, Baby

The Washington Times (Washington, DC), May 4, 2007 | Go to article overview

Problem? Just Ban It, Baby


Byline: Tom Knott, THE WASHINGTON TIMES

So there is a move afoot in baseball to ban alcohol in the clubhouse following the traffic death of Cardinals pitcher Josh Hancock in the wee hours Sunday.

News reports suggest Hancock may have been intoxicated before plowing a rented Ford Explorer into the rear of a tow truck.

If an alcohol ban in the clubhouse can save one life, then it all will have been worth it.

And while many of us dabble in the life-saving business this week, we also should consider employing bans against anything that possibly would interfere with operating a vehicle, whether that would be talking on a cell phone, applying makeup, listening to an iPod or reading the newspaper.

Perhaps we should just ban vehicles altogether. According to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, in the latest available statistics, 43,443 people were killed on our nation's highways in 2005. That represented a 1.4 percent increase from 42,836 deaths in 2004.

If we could save 40,000-plus lives each year, then banning vehicles all would be worth it.

Of course, we then would have a spike in bicycle-related fatalities.

We could ban them, too, all in the interest of saving lives.

Then the cholesterol-clogged souls among us would start keeling over in greater numbers because of the strenuous activity of walking.

That is what trans fat has done to our nation.

McDonald's, too.

And all the other fast-food peddlers of death.

It is so sad that there is a segment of the population that missed the memo on junk food.

And it is equally sad - excuse the tears - that there is an element in baseball that apparently does not know it is against to law to drive while under the influence of alcohol.

So it is clear that alcohol must be banned in the clubhouse, although how that would have saved Hancock early Sunday morning following an afternoon game Saturday is difficult to comprehend unless he was partying in the clubhouse all those hours. …

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