Family: JOB DONE; WHY KIDS SHOULD BE ALLOWED TO CHOOSE THEIR OWN CAREERS

Daily Post (Liverpool, England), May 5, 2007 | Go to article overview

Family: JOB DONE; WHY KIDS SHOULD BE ALLOWED TO CHOOSE THEIR OWN CAREERS


Byline: By LISA SALMON

IN the past, many parents steered their children towards careers as doctors or solicitors, believing they knew best what would bring their offspring happiness and wealth. But attitudes have changed, and it seems modern parents no longer see it as their role to push their kids down a career path.

In fact, a recent poll of parents of under-18s found 59% believed they shouldn't have too much influence over their child's job choices, despite almost three quarters (72%) of them saying they have the greatest influence on their child's views.

The strength of that influence is not lost on careers advisors, who welcome parents' support as their children make one of the most important decisions of their lives.

Jerry Young, operations manager for iGen, a division of Leeds Careers, says parents often attend when young people have careers interviews, and although there are occasions when it's just the parent who does the talking, generally it's a good thing.

"Parents are the greatest influence on children's choices, and their involvement is helpful," he says.

"After careers interviews, parents and children go away and discuss it, and parents help the child think about the qualities they need to consider when making a career decision."

One of the problems with parents getting involved is that they can apply old rules with regards to issues such as pay, qualifications needed and even what certain jobs entail. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Family: JOB DONE; WHY KIDS SHOULD BE ALLOWED TO CHOOSE THEIR OWN CAREERS
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.