Driving through; Car Culture Is Booming in China, and So Are Roadside Eateries Aimed at Hurried Travelers. Beware White Lightning

By Liu, Melinda | Newsweek International, May 14, 2007 | Go to article overview

Driving through; Car Culture Is Booming in China, and So Are Roadside Eateries Aimed at Hurried Travelers. Beware White Lightning


Liu, Melinda, Newsweek International


Byline: Melinda Liu

Spring has sprung. The hills north of Beijing are alive with ... the sound of noisy restaurant attendants, some waving red banners, standing at the side of the road shouting, "Stop here for a delicious meal!" at the throngs of city dwellers zooming by in their cars.

Chinese are hitting the road in record numbers. Car ownership more than tripled between 2000 and 2006, and China is now the world's second largest auto market after the United States. This love affair is spawning booming new auto-service industries, from vehicle accessories to roadside eateries. For better or worse, China is beginning to look--and taste--a lot like America in the 1950s. McDonald's and KFC (known for its Kentucky Fried Chicken outlets all over the country) plan to open 25 drive-through restaurants in China; both began testing the waters with drive-ins in Beijing and elsewhere in 2005.

McDonald's has entered into a strategic alliance with Sinopec, China's biggest oil producer and marketer, to open drive-through restaurants at Sinopec service stations across the country. (The retail oil giant has 30,000-plus gas stations and is adding more than 500 each year.) The first drive-in under this pact opened in the Beijing suburbs in January "to bring convenient, great-tasting McDonald's meals to China's increasingly mobile customers," as the firms' press release put it.

But Chinese don't need foreigners to tell them that keeping motorists fed and watered is big business. …

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