Statistics Producers' Corner

Business Economics, October 1994 | Go to article overview

Statistics Producers' Corner


REGIONAL ECONOMIC DATA

REGIONAL DATA -- by state, county and metropolitan area, and economic area -- add texture and depth to national developments. Their sheer volume, especially when provided with industry or other detail, has made electronic media especially popular. The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) recently released several important regional data products.

In August, BEA released new estimates of gross state product for 1991 and revised annual estimates for 1977-90. These estimates are consistent with the national gross domestic product by industry estimates released in the November 1993 Survey of Current Business and are prepared for both current and constant (1987) dollars for each of sixty-one industries. Summary statistics were in the August issue of the Survey. For information on methodology, availability of unpublished data, and ordering the estimates on diskettes, contact Dick Beemiller, Chief, Gross State Product by Industry Branch, 202-606-5340.

Two major publications present full time series of regional personal income. In September, Local Area Personal Income, 1969-92 presented revised estimates for counties and metropolitan areas. These estimates incorporated journey-to-work data from the 1990 Census of Population. State Personal Income: 1929-93 will be out later in the Fall. Each volume will contain an updated description of the sources and methods used to produce the estimates. For more information, contact Lynn Hazen, Chief, Regional Economic Measurement Division, 202-606-9254.

This Fall, BEA will publish a Federal Register notice summarizing comments on the data and procedures being used to update the BEA Economic Areas and proposing a set of boundary changes. Users' comments on the proposed areas, which are nodal functional economic areas designed to facilitate regional economic analysis, will be solicited. In December 1994, BEA will publish a further notice that will present the final boundary changes. These changes will be discussed in the Survey. In 1995, as part of its next set of regional projections, BEA plans to prepare projections for the redefined economic areas. For more information, contact Ken Johnson, Regional Economic Analysis Division, 202-606-9219.

BEA's CD-ROM continues to be a rich source for regional data. The latest version, released in May, contains twenty-four years (1969-92) of personal income for all states, counties, and metropolitan areas, a description of the sources and methods used to estimate personal income, and software that allows the user to display, print, or copy one or more of the standard tables from the historical series. Additionally, the CD-ROM contains estimates of gross state product, projections to 2040 of income and employment for states and metropolitan areas, quarterly state personal income, and Census Bureau data on intercounty commuting flows for 1960, 1970, 1980 and 1990. These additional data are in a format easily importable into spreadsheet or database software. The price is $35.00. For more information, or to order the CD-ROM, contact the Regional Economic Information Service, 202-606-5360. In addition, many of BEA's estimates are available on the Commerce Department Economic Bulletin Board; for information, call 202-482-1986.

DATA FOR COMMUNICATION SERVICES INDUSTRIES

Technological innovation and government policies have encouraged video, voice, and data services that were unthinkable only a decade ago. …

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