Recommended Practices and Professional Excellence

By Esser, Jeffrey L. | Government Finance Review, October 1994 | Go to article overview

Recommended Practices and Professional Excellence


Esser, Jeffrey L., Government Finance Review


The fundamental purpose of the Government Finance Officers Association (GFOA) is to enhance and promote the professional management of governmental financial resources by identifying, developing and advancing fiscal strategies, policies and practices for the public benefit. Traditionally, GFOA has relied on the development of publications and training programs to fulfill this mission, along with awards programs, research projects, and the adoption of formal policy statements addressing federal fiscal issues and recommended practices that the GFOA suggests state and local governments follow.

Early in 1993, the GFOA Executive Board reviewed the various policy statements of the organization, which are developed initially by the GFOA standing committees then approved by the Executive Board and the membership. Recognizing the value of "recommended practices" and the important role they play in helping GFOA members implement what the profession accepts as preferred practice, the board decided to give greater emphasis to this activity. To embark on this new direction, the board asked the standing committees and the staff to carefully review current GFOA recommended practices and to identify areas for which recommended practices should be developed. This fundamental shift in focus is already bearing fruit.

During the 1994 Annual Conference in Minneapolis, work was completed on a number of recommended practices covering such diverse topics as funding practices of pension plans and the importance of meaningful performance measures. These new recommended practices have been added to a GFOA publication--a compilation of GFOA's recommended practices--which is updated annually and made available at no charge on a request basis. Other recommended practices that have been developed over the years are concerned with following generally accepted accounting principles, adhering to the GFOA Disclosure Guidelines for State and Local Government Securities, and investing public funds prudently. The GFOA now has 31 current recommended practices. However, GFOA members are strongly encouraged to suggest areas for future recommended practices, as our work has only just begun.

Recommended practices serve other purposes that extend beyond the association's goals. The GFOA Code of Professional Ethics sets forth several standards of conduct that all government finance officers are enjoined to adhere to in the fulfillment of their professional responsibilities to enhance the performance of all persons engaged in public finance. Recommended practices provide guidance to individual finance officers in meeting these standards.

The Code of Ethics urges finance officers, for example, to abide by professional practices and recommended standards and to promote excellence in the public service. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Recommended Practices and Professional Excellence
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.