Interactive Video Games in Physical Education: Rather Than Contribute to a Sedentary Lifestyle, These Games Demand Activity from the Players

By Trout, Josh; Christie, Brett | JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance, May-June 2007 | Go to article overview

Interactive Video Games in Physical Education: Rather Than Contribute to a Sedentary Lifestyle, These Games Demand Activity from the Players


Trout, Josh, Christie, Brett, JOPERD--The Journal of Physical Education, Recreation & Dance


Physical Education has become a popular venue for innovative technologies in recent years. In addition to the use of personal digital assistants (PDAs), pedometers, heart rate monitors, laptops, and performance analysis software, physical educators are gradually introducing students to interactive video games. These games, in contrast to those discussed by Hayes and Silberman (2007), require the player(s) to be physically active, thereby negating the long-standing belief that all video games contribute to a sedentary lifestyle.

Technology is by no means a prerequisite for educational games. Similarly, technology should not replace effective teaching, but should be viewed as a supplement to appropriate pedagogical practices. In an overweight nation where obesity is the second leading cause of death due, in part, to physical inactivity (Mokdad, Marks, Stroup, & Gerberding, 2004), any strategy for increasing or promoting physical activity is worth exploring.

Physical inactivity is a major contributor to the obesity epidemic spreading across the country (Kujala, Kaprio, Sarna, & Markku, 1998). The percentage of overweight children and teens (ages 6-19) in the United States tripled from about 5 percent in 1980 to roughly 16 percent in 2002 (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 2005). These alarming figures should spur us to get youths more active.

In recent years, interactive video games have crept into physical education settings, making physical activity fun and challenging for both high- and low-skilled students. Interactive video games offer more than just animated exercise. Many of these games have built-in assessments, such as scoring systems based on skill performance, as well as heart rate monitors and caloric expenditure estimates. Some are even specifically designed to enhance motor abilities such as balance, hand-eye coordination, agility, and core strength. These engaging, interactive video games have the potential to increase physical activity levels among children and teenagers. They can also serve as a tool to educate students about the physiological functions of their body, such as how their heart responds to various intensities of activity.

The topic of interactive arcade games in physical education is a new phenomenon, so empirical evidence is not yet available to support the wealth of positive outcomes proclaimed by teachers and students in the popular media. Despite the lack of research, the state of West Virginia had enough confidence in Dance Dance Revolution (DDR, described below) to authorize the purchase of one machine for each of its 765 public school physical education programs, at a cost of $740 apiece (Toppo, 2006).

While interactive arcade games may enhance skills such as coordination, reaction time, endurance, speed, and agility, there is no research stating that, even if learned, these skills would transfer to other sporting contexts. However, interactive arcade games would be no less valuable if they failed to improve skills in other sports or physical activities. Teaching students to be physically active for life is the aim of physical educators, but at present only 30 percent of adult men and women regularly engage in physical activity (National Center for Health Statistics, 2005). Thus, exploring innovative curricular ideas such as interactive arcade games seems necessary and even urgent.

The two most popular video game consoles--Microsoft Xbox and Sony Playstation--are highly equipped for physically active gameplay with high-tech cameras, accessories (e.g., light-gun, dance pad, steering wheel), and Internet connections to compete against others online. Although the idea will likely provoke mixed opinions, video games may provide a more popular outlet for lifetime physical activity than more traditional sports and physical activities. This trend has already begun, as DDR tournaments are currently being held all over the world. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Interactive Video Games in Physical Education: Rather Than Contribute to a Sedentary Lifestyle, These Games Demand Activity from the Players
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.