Much-Maligned Lobbyists Play a Crucial Role

By Lamar, Stephen | Insight on the News, January 9, 1995 | Go to article overview

Much-Maligned Lobbyists Play a Crucial Role


Lamar, Stephen, Insight on the News


This year's debate on lobbying reform underscores a continuing public hostility toward lobbyists and their profession. In the rush to pass new, overly restrictive lobbying regulations, Congress often forgets that citizens have a right to hire (or be) lobbyists. Congress should find a way to enact the useful elements of lobbying reform without trampling the public's basic lobbying rights.

For years, lobbyists have been the scapegoat of almost every failed initiative. While much of this scorn has been heaped on the so-called bad lobbyists (shills for gun-loving, ozonedepleting, tax-avoiding foreign entities), the so-called good lobbyists (advocates for environment-preserving, homeless-aiding, peace-advancing causes) have been tarnished as well.

At the same time, lobbyists are in demand. Lobbying registrations have increased by 30 percent during the past six years. Just about every group has a lobbyist or two to protect their interests in Washington. Even lobbyists have lobbyists.

Moreover, along with journalists and assorted members of the clergy, lobbyists are protected by the First Amendment. But while this constitutional blessing may not translate into public adoration -- just witness the lack of public warmth for the media -- it does confer a certain amount of professional distinction. And it certainly should provide some legal guarantees against excessive restrictions, both to the lobbyists and to the people who want to hire them.

Among other things, the First Amendment reads "Congress shall make no law respecting ... the right of the people ... to petition the government for a redress of grievances." Clearly, the framers of the Constitution believed that free access to the government was a key element -- along with an independent press and freedom of religion -- of a vigorous democracy.

Despite these constitutional admonitions, Congress already has passed legislation requiring lobbyists to register their clients and disclose their activities, including confidential memos. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Much-Maligned Lobbyists Play a Crucial Role
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.