The National Association of School Nurses

By Luker, Tricia | The Exceptional Parent, May 2007 | Go to article overview

The National Association of School Nurses


Luker, Tricia, The Exceptional Parent


The National Association of School Nurses

(NASN) had its start in 1968 as the Department of School Nurses (DSN), formed by the National Education Association to advance school nursing practices and the health of school age students. The DSN's early years were dedicated to establishing school nurse credentialing standards in all states. The DSN also established chapters in each state. In 1979 the organization separated from the National Education Association and became incorporated as the National Association of School Nurses.

The NASN's mission is to "improve the health and educational success of children and youth by developing and providing leadership to advance school nursing practice." Its core purpose is to "promote student success through the advancement of school health services by professional registered school nurses." Its core values, "scholarship, excellence, integrity and collegiality," when coupled with its mission and core purpose, has led the NASN to become the leading worldwide expert for school health services.

The NASN provides an organizational voice to the needs and objectives of the thousands of school nurses working nationwide. To that end, the NASN in 1999 adopted the following definition of school nursing:

"School nursing is a specialized practice of professional nursing that advances the well being, academic success, and life-long achievement of students. To that end, school nurses facilitate positive student responses to normal development; promote health and safety; intervene with actual and potential health problems; provide case management services; and actively collaborate with others to build student and family capacity for adaptation, self management, self advocacy, and learning."

The NASN advances its objectives through several activities. The NASN is an accredited continuing nurses education provider and prepares Live Continuing Education programs for the use of NASN chapters at the state or local level.

The NASN also publishes the Journal of School Nursing, a peer-reviewed journal that also serves as the official journal of the NASN. The Journal, published bi-monthly, contains articles on all facets of school nursing practice.

The NASN also actively represents its organizational and individual voices through the development of position statements, consensus statements, and organizational resolutions. …

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