Building a Web Presence: Weblogs Are Becoming Essential in School Districts across the Country

By Richardson, Will | District Administration, May 2007 | Go to article overview

Building a Web Presence: Weblogs Are Becoming Essential in School Districts across the Country


Richardson, Will, District Administration


HERE'S THE RECIPE: GIVE teachers and students Weblogs in which to write and publish work for global audiences, add pointers on publishing and communicating safely online, drop in a pinch of collaboration and support by experienced bloggers, and watch what happens.

For fifth-grade students in Georgia, working with education consultant Anne Davis, the result was a group blog called "Blogical Mind" for exchanging ideas on literacy inside and outside classrooms, and individual student blogs on related topics. Examples of the latter include "Eddie's Rainbow of Thought," "Victoria's Dreams of Wonder," and "Mia's Hall of Fame," linked to the collective site and also accessible directly. The blogs are drawing readers throughout the United States and as far away as Australia, and the bloggers are learning the importance of online communities and having a "clickable" presence on the Web.

Gaining Access

Unfortunately, many administrators prevent school users from establishing an online presence, fearing that simply being online puts their districts in danger. Many are also influenced by the few but tragic incidents that have involved social networking sites such as MySpace, even though 40 million adolescents are participating in such sites. But while the Internet does indeed carry risks, as does life offline, tens of thousands of students and teachers publish content to the Web daily in safe and ethical ways. For example, students in an AP psychology class in Nashua, N.H., created video projects about sleep disorders and posted them on YouTube; elementary school students in Omaha, Neb., recorded and published podcasts on the school site Radio WillowWeb; and school bloggers in many places are connected to the world and participate in amazing conversations about topics that interest them. All of this comes from having an online presence, and Eddie, Victoria and Mia are learning how to find students and teachers "out there" and are helping others find them. In this new Read/Write Web world, not knowing how to do that limits our students to whatever happens to be within the four walls of the classroom, at the place and time that they are there. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Building a Web Presence: Weblogs Are Becoming Essential in School Districts across the Country
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.