Revealed: Tony Blair Was the Sixth Spice Girl

By Mirza, Shazia | New Statesman (1996), May 14, 2007 | Go to article overview

Revealed: Tony Blair Was the Sixth Spice Girl


Mirza, Shazia, New Statesman (1996)


Tony Blair, you have been evicted. Please leave the House of Commons. Pack your belongings--you have three weeks to leave and say your goodbyes. You are live on Radio 4; please do not swear.

[ILLUSTRATION OMITTED]

Tony Blair was our first metrosexual celebrity prime minister; he had enough personality to be gay, yet caused enough atrocities to be straight. He was the sixth Spice Girl. It was easy to warm to Tony; he had a great smile, the smile that crashed a thousand F-117s. He seemed fun; he played You Say We Pay on Richard and Judy, and told Catherine Tate that he wasn't bovvered. He appealed to young people from all classes, and cultivated the common touch--which enabled him to communicate with George Bush.

But when a prime minister retires--that's when we really find out what he's like. That is when the skeletons come out of the closet. That is when we discover that Tony Blair has been conducting a rampaging affair with Ann Widdecombe in Margaret Beckett's caravan, and she in her biography reveals all about his black leather thongs, whips, chains and handcuffs tucked away under the picnic chairs--which perhaps offer an explanation for that permanent grin. Then Cherie will cause further stir by agreeing to an interview with Martin Bashir and disclosing: "There was too much Bush in this marriage. It got a bit crowded." That's when we'll get to know the real Tony.

The Queen will of course invest him with the usual honour for a departing prime minister, and bestow upon him the title "Lord Blair of Baghdad". The going rate for this title is [pounds sterling]2m--so Tony can afford it. He'll soon become the darling of the after-dinner speakers' circuit, charming corporate fat cats with tales of wars and peerages as they tuck into their cremes brulees.

Thinking back to the 1980s, I realise that Margaret Thatcher was a far more divisive figure than Blair, because 50 per cent of the country hated her--while 95 per cent hate him. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Revealed: Tony Blair Was the Sixth Spice Girl
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.