Africans and World War II: An Annotated Bibliography

By Sims-Woods, Janet | Negro History Bulletin, December 1993 | Go to article overview

Africans and World War II: An Annotated Bibliography


Sims-Woods, Janet, Negro History Bulletin


Anderson, Trezzvant W. Come Out Fighting: The Epic Tale Of The 761st Tank Battalion, 1942-1945. Salzburg, Germany: Salzburger druckerei and verlag, 1945, 135p.

The 761st was selected for an occupational role in Germany after originally being scheduled for battle in the Pacific. It was the first armored unit in the history of the Army to enter combat with African Americans manning its weapons and vehicles. Their motto was "come out fighting."

Arnold, Thomas St. John. Buffalo Soldiers: The 92nd Division And Reinforcements In World War II, 1942-1945. Manhattan, KS: Sunflower University Press, 1990, 245p.

Arnold states that the 92nd Infantry was the only black division to fight in World War II as a division. When reinforced by the attachment of many U.S., British, and Italian troop units, the 92nd became integrated at regimental and unit levels as well as a combined Allied force. It was the largest division in the field during the war.

Biggs, Bradley. The Triple Nickels: America's First All-Black Paratroop Unit. Hamden, CT: Archon Books, 1986, 92p.

The "Triple Nickels" (the 555th Battalion, 82nd Airborne) were the nation's first all-black parachute infantry test platoon, company and battalion. The first army unit to be integrated into the regular Army, it was previously the fire fighting unit assigned to counter the Japanese air balloon attacks in the Pacific Northwest.

Buchanan, Albert R. Black Americans In World War II. Santa Barbara, CA: Clio Books, 1977, 148p.

Examines the role of African Americans in the military, advances made by African Americans through the judicial system, the status of black women during World War II, periods of racial violence and the relationship between African Americans and organized labor.

Byers, Jean. A Study Of The Negro In Military Service. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of Defense, 1950, 263p.

This monograph presents the results of a study based on department records, historical materials and press reports. Examines their role in previous wars, African Americans and Selective Service, Army policy, and gives a record of black non-combat troops.

Dalfiume, Richard M. Desegregation Of The U.S. Armed Forces: Fighting On two Fronts, 1939-1953. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 1969, 252p.

Describes the change in the racial policy of the military services and the African American's reaction to this policy from 1939-1953.

In World War II, African Americans cried out to end discrimination by calling for a "Double V": victory overseas against Nazi racism, and also a victory against racism in America. Notes that World War II was not the first cry for a "Double V": it has been a theme maintained through the history of the black soldier in the American military.

Douglas, Hon. Helen Gahagan. The Negro Soldier. Washington, D.C.: U.S. House of Representatives. February 1, 1946, 38p.

Douglas provides a partial record of the devotion and heroism of black soldiers, which she obtained from the files of the War and Navy Departments.

Downey, Bill. Uncle Sam Must Be Losing The War: Black Marines Of The 51st. San Francisco, CA: Strawberry Hill Press, 1982, 217p.

By September 1942, the Marines were the last military branch to admit African Americans. This is the story of Bill Downey's experiences as one of those first black Marines during World War II.

Early, Charity Adams. One Woman's Army: A Black Officer Remembers The WAC. College Station: Texas A & M University Press, 1989, 218p.

Adams recounts her successes and struggles as one of the WAC's first black officers, and as commanding officer of the only unit of black women, the 6888th Central Postal Directory Battalion, to serve overseas during World War II.

Ferguson, William C. Black Flyers In World War II. Cleveland, OH: W. C. Ferguson, 1987, 64p.

A pictorial history of the Tuskegge Airmen. …

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