Rock Takes a Leaf out of Family Trees; Charting Liverpool's Rich Pop Music Heritage

Liverpool Echo (Liverpool, England), June 9, 2007 | Go to article overview

Rock Takes a Leaf out of Family Trees; Charting Liverpool's Rich Pop Music Heritage


THE subject of rock music history cannot be discussed without first mentioning Pete Frame.

His work has often been referred to as legendary - a word that gets bandied about a bit too easily, but in the world of rock criticism Pete Frame fully deserves the accolade.

While the music journalist has been involved in several branches of the music business since the 1960s, Frame is primarily renowned for his Rock Family Trees.

These extensive charts explore the evolution of bands, regional scenes, and rock sub-genres. They do so by documenting the shifting line-ups of band members, spin-off groups, where musicians came from and went to before and after their peak periods of fame.

The family trees have been the basis for several books, and are familiar even to those who have never read them in their original form but have viewed them in the many magazines, tour guides and television programmes they have featured in.

The idea for the trees came about almost by accident when Frame was having difficulty putting into words the different groups guitar player Al Kooper had played with.

He decided it would be easier to just draw out his musical history in a family tree design.

Frame became a rock journalist in the late '60s, after falling in love with the music as a teenager.

At the time, there were few publications dealing with rock music, so he decided to start Zigzag. …

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