FRIENDS UNITED; SCOTS AND REFUGEES PUT THEIR CULTURAL DIFFERENCES ASIDE TO BE BEST OF PALS Next Monday Sees the Start of Refugee Week, a Programme of Arts, Cultural and Educational Events to Celebrate the Contribution of Refugees to the UK

Daily Record (Glasgow, Scotland), June 11, 2007 | Go to article overview

FRIENDS UNITED; SCOTS AND REFUGEES PUT THEIR CULTURAL DIFFERENCES ASIDE TO BE BEST OF PALS Next Monday Sees the Start of Refugee Week, a Programme of Arts, Cultural and Educational Events to Celebrate the Contribution of Refugees to the UK


Byline: Annie Brown

SCOTS AND REFUGEES PUT THEIR CULTURAL DIFFERENCES ASIDE TO BE BEST OF PALS Next Monday sees the start of Refugee Week, a programme of arts, cultural and educational events to celebrate the contribution of refugees to the UK. The hope is to encourage a better understanding between the refugees and host communities. But as the Scottish Refugee Council reveal, cultural differences have already been overcome and bonds have been formed across Scotland. Annie Brown has been finding out what has drawn them together...

CAROLINE & MARIAMA FROM SIERRA LEONE

Caroline Lang, 45, with Amanda, 18, Scotland & Mariama Darboe, 29, with Ahmed Sumbunou, nine, Ibrahim, five, and Nancy, five months old, Sierra Leone

WHATCAROLINE THINKS:

'I first met Mariama through Ahmed's previous school when I coached the football team he played on. It was like the United Nations: children from the Congo, Cameroon, Sierra Leone, Turkey, Iran, Pakistan, Uganda, Scotland. Kids from all over the world, that made such a difference to the school.

Everyone in Kennishead knows Mariama - both young and old - and her big smile. She volunteers in the community centre, goes into schools and talks to the children.

When Mariama asked me to be Nancy's godmother, it was the proudest day of my life. Nancy means everything to me, as does Mariama and the rest of her family. They are my best friends.'

WHAT MIRIAMA THINKS:

'Caroline has been there from day one for me and my family and we have become firm friends. She knows how to encourage me and keep my spirits up. She and Amanda are my family here. To stay in Glasgow is my dream. I don't want to leave these people'

WHAT AHMED THINKS:

'Mrs Lang was a great football coach. Everyone on that team, we might have all been from different countries, but we're all the same, all equal. The only difference between me and my friends is I support Celtic and most of them support Rangers. We all watch Old Firm games in my house.'

THE MacDONALDS & THE BALAJS FROMSERBIA

WHAT DIANA THINKS:

'When I met Eilidh two years ago, she was so friendly, asking where I was from and about my family. I wasn't surprised by that because all the Scottish people I have met have been really friendly.

We started going to each others' houses for coffee, our children would play together and we would talk. Some days I could get down, a young mum, being here with just my husband and kids, with no other friends or family. Plus I wasn't able to speak the language at first.

But Eilidh would know how I was feeling. She's so intelligent and can see a way to everything. She'll help with my children, offer to babysit. Simple things like that mean such a lot to me.'

WHATEILIDH THINKS:

'I first met Diana at the local mothers and toddlers group. She would be translating for some of the other mothers. Her English grammar is better than mine.

I was there with Reuben, who was four months old. Diana had Denis, who was a wee bit older. Diana seemed to be holding it together as a young mother, and, just starting out myself, that was a reassurance.

I saw her with her children and I thought, it'll be OK. It was a good support to speak to someone that one step ahead, who had done the toilet training, who could talk about mum stuff.

It must be so hard being a young family in Diana's situation and the uncertainty, learning the language and getting the kids involved and integrated. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

FRIENDS UNITED; SCOTS AND REFUGEES PUT THEIR CULTURAL DIFFERENCES ASIDE TO BE BEST OF PALS Next Monday Sees the Start of Refugee Week, a Programme of Arts, Cultural and Educational Events to Celebrate the Contribution of Refugees to the UK
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.