History Mystery

By Dorr, Robert F. | Air Power History, Summer 2007 | Go to article overview

History Mystery


Dorr, Robert F., Air Power History


Our spring mystery aircraft, as many Air Power History readers knew, was the Air Force's E-9A "Widget" airborne telemetry platform. The E-9A is the only U.S. military version of the De Havilland Dash-8 (or DHC-8) airliner, also known as the Bombardier Q100.

Our background on the commercial version comes from The Vital Guide to Airliners, by Robert Hewson: The Dash-8 was developed as a 36 to 39 seat passenger aircraft for regional carriers and made its first flight on June 20, 1983. The Dash-8's next milestone, its first airline revenue flight, took place on December 19, 1984. The Canadian manufacturer, now known as Bombardier, has built about 500 Dash-8s.

The military E-9A "Widget" is based on the DHC-8-100 model and is configured as missile/drone range control aircraft, modified with ANAPS-128D sea surveillance radar manufactured by Telephonics in a ventral dome, and with a large electronically steered phased array radar, designed and installed by Georgia Tech Research Institute, in the fuselage side.

Two E-9As are operated by a mix of civilian and military personnel of the 82d Aerial Target Squadron, a component of the 53d Weapons Evaluation Group (formerly the 475th Weapons Evaluation Group), at Tyndall Air Force Base, Florida.

Retired Air Force Col. C.R. "Dick" Anderegg, who commanded the 475th group from 1991 to 1994, said the E-9A provides ocean surface surveillance of the missile range in the Gulf of Mexico. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

History Mystery
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.