Night of the Queens

By McPherson, Heather | Hecate, October 1994 | Go to article overview

Night of the Queens


McPherson, Heather, Hecate


The Night Queen's coming - sending her premonitions on ahead, the Night Queen's coming, beaming - already she looses a shower of small grey grainy drops warning the stars to light - she lifts her arms and shadowy from her underarms fall scents and incense, grape vines, tangerines, breath - as soon as the day dissolves she will over-arch us -

down in the Town Hall car park where floats are warming up and the exhaust is rising puffs of bluish-white and pixies in tights are twisting yellow and orange balloons into a pyramid and a flimsy archway entrance spells out HERO - and a Venus of Willendorf bum juts, silvery - or is it the Great Mother - who is the centre, figurehead - who has being without her? She is the longest eye, the first creation - She precedes histories, imprisonments, hangings, stonings - She came before three-personed patriarchs and holy ghosts - tonight She is naked, the moon goddess - her breasts are drupes, she is hairless, her platform is alive with Amazons, silver-painted, breast-plated, shaking double-headed axes up at the railings - above her, powerful, is four-armed Kali - darkly, richly red, gold, jewels - all our goddesses we call tonight, all our children of the life - and below her the dykes are wiring up speakers and guitars - this night we come out singing - in our bands

and here are other decorated trucks - two silvery breasted dancers swirl in a plastic bubble dome -

and cosmic man, an athlete, swinging wildly in a gyroscope - and the Fairy Queen takes his perch in a white bower - and Carmen straightens his stocking seams, the drivers take their seats - Stilt Woman thrusts her fire-brand into a flame and it bursts, burning, high -

hey, hey, we're off - we're away - we're taking the turn into Queen Street!

and all those years in the wilderness - hundreds! thousands! are going, going, gone - in a small acceleration, a false start, revving, brakeage - in a tremor, roaring, in a rush -

a bouquet rises - surrounded by outbursts of white camellia it sprouts roses of elation and scarlet hibiscus behind the ear - it comes in a mix of brown and pink faces transparently thrilled to be here - it comes in feathers, vinery, starry eyes, in floats and flowers - tucked into optimist buds - ponga and fern and greenery - sniff the petrol fumes and tears and heady hungover wine -

here we are, O here we are, Night Queen! Here we are stopping the traffic in Queen Street - here we are stroppily Queens of the Night -

here we assemble - bare-breasted with torches, in Valkyrie helmets, operatically peaked - here we are bands of us - duo and trio, con brio in satin, black leather and net - here we are sporting our gauzy wings, lipstick - here we go prancing in falsies and drag, in skinny-dip, clown-face - with axes, grins, instruments - singing our heads off, playing fool, flute, guitar - here we are with our saucy boobs, cheeky bums, jock-straps - here we breeze slinky, with palmed hair and ties - here we go clumping in dyke boots and brilliantine - here we go strapless, strutting pink-gowned in fake fur - flamboyantly femme among bobbing balloons - here we go bra-less, curious, outre - here we are, goddess! …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Night of the Queens
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.