Social Security for Immigrants: At President Bush's Behest, Plans Have Been Created, and Are Being Implemented, for a "Totalization Agreement" with Mexico-Which Would Give U.S. Social Security Benefits to Millions of Mexican Citizens

By Kirkwood, R. Cort | The New American, June 11, 2007 | Go to article overview

Social Security for Immigrants: At President Bush's Behest, Plans Have Been Created, and Are Being Implemented, for a "Totalization Agreement" with Mexico-Which Would Give U.S. Social Security Benefits to Millions of Mexican Citizens


Kirkwood, R. Cort, The New American


When Social Security was created in the 1930s, intelligent observers said it would fail.

Its first recipient, Ida Fuller, contributed less than $25. After 35 years of retirement, Fuller died, having pocketed nearly $25,000. Not a bad return. At the program's inception, numerous workers paid into the program compared to the number of people receiving benefits. That's the situation no longer. With baby boomers retiring soon and the so-called trust fund filled with IOUs, the Social Security system is headed for disaster.

Now President Bush wants to add a few million people to the rolls of Social Security. Adding more Americans would be bad enough. But Presidente Arbusto wants to bring Mexican citizens onto its rolls, most of them now illegal aliens.

The president's position is hardly surprising, given his amnesty plan for illegals and the not-so-secret blueprint for melding the United States, Mexico, and Canada into a North American Union that would erase American citizenship and sovereignty. But perhaps the effrontery of the idea, which slaps the face of every real American who involuntarily contributes to Social Security, will sink this ship before it sails.

"Totalization"

Illegal aliens would receive Social Security under an agreement hatched in 2004, awaiting the signature of Bush, similar to agreements the United States has signed with many countries. These pacts, all of them unconstitutional, of course, are called "totalization agreements." They permit an American living abroad, or foreign worker living here, to escape the double taxation that would occur if he paid into each country's government retirement plan. As well, the agreement permits a person to "totalize" his social security payments into each country's program if he never worked in one country long enough to qualify for benefits from either.

The United States maintains totalization agreements with many countries, almost all of them European. Now, the president wants to sign a totalization agreement with Mexico. Problem is, the relationship between the United States and Mexico is of a different breed than that between the United States and Europe.

Unbeknownst to most Americans, the idea of giving Social Security to illegal immigrants is not new; the totalization agreement would merely escalate the giveaway to a grand scale. Social Security already views some illegal aliens as it does any other American, as the Center for Immigration Studies (CIS) reports. The Social Security Administration "permits foreign nationals to work many years illegally with one or more fraudulently obtained Social Security numbers, acquire legal status (e.g. through an amnesty or marriage to a U.S. citizen), obtain a valid SSN, and then request that his or her prior earnings credits be moved to the new number." Prior to 2004, before Congress banned the practice, illegals could return home and collect Social Security legally.

Totalization would undermine that ban, immigration analyst Ed Rubenstein reported, because the 2004 law contains a loophole for illegals from countries with which the United States has totalization agreements. Those illegals could collect Social Security, which offers one reason the elites want the agreement: they can skirt the congressional ban. But again, illegals from other countries differ markedly from Mexico's in important respects: millions of militant Finns, Swedes, and Germans are neither here illegally nor agitating for per mission to come here; and European countries have social security plans on par with ours, unlike Mexico--meaning we get to foot Mexico's retirement bills.

As for the agreement itself, a pact with Mexico undermines even the concept of totalization, which assumes that a foreign corporation sends a worker to the United States, and that the foreign corporation and workers have contributed to the person's home-country social security account. "After working a limited number of years abroad," CIS observes, "workers return to their home country and resume paying social security taxes, eventually vesting for benefits based upon their combined work history in both countries. …

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Social Security for Immigrants: At President Bush's Behest, Plans Have Been Created, and Are Being Implemented, for a "Totalization Agreement" with Mexico-Which Would Give U.S. Social Security Benefits to Millions of Mexican Citizens
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