The Crash of USAir Flight 1016: Emergency Preparedness

By Barry, John M. | Journal of Environmental Health, December 1994 | Go to article overview

The Crash of USAir Flight 1016: Emergency Preparedness


Barry, John M., Journal of Environmental Health


Introduction

Mecklenburg County (population 556,731 as of March 1994), its townships and municipalities, including the City of Charlotte, are subject to a wide spectrum of hazards, both natural and manmade. The City of Charlotte and Mecklenburg County have developed the Charlotte-Mecklenburg County Integrated Response Plan for All Hazards. This All Hazards Plan is designed to be used in isolated incidents or for emergencies that affect an entire municipality or multi-county area. Built-in flexibility allows it to be used in a field operational setting without the activation of the Emergency Operations Center ("EOC") or in harmony with EOC operations.

The 2-inch thick plan provides a guide for use in emergency operations but does not eliminate the quality of personal initiative which is often necessary in the mitigation of a rapidly evolving incident. The plan maintains a sense of continuity between elected representatives, city/county management, and emergency response organizations which is imperative in a disaster/emergency setting which threatens the safety and well being of the community.

The plan addresses four major categories of incidents identified through a hazard analysis study:

1. Transportation: Plane crashes, railroad accidents or derailments, truck/trailer accidents, and commercial or school bus accidents.

2. Industry: Major fire, explosion, building collapse, pesticide spill or fire, large petroleum spill or fire, and chemical or other hazardous material spill or fire.

3. Weather: Any naturally occurring condition of major proportion that results in a disastrous condition requiring major response of local government resources.

4. Other: A listing of various hazards, including the two nuclear power plants in the community that were identified through the hazardous analysis study for Charlotte-Mecklenburg County.

The crash of USAir Flight 1016 not only tested the completeness of the All Hazards Plan, but served to reinforce the need for periodic exercises. In this particular case, there had been several exercises simulating a crash of a passenger airline--one of which had been in the immediate vicinity of the crash site.

This paper will concentrate on emergency response activities surrounding the crash of Flight 1016. This type of analysis may give other jurisdictions insight into disaster responses of this nature.

Scenario

USAir Flight 1016 was on its final approach to Charlotte/Douglas International Airport when it encountered a wind sheer problem. As the pilot attempted to abort the landing, the plane lost altitude and crashed into a field approximately 2,200 feet west and 1,700 feet south of the runway at a speed of about 160 miles per hour. The plane then skidded over 900 feet through a grove of trees and burst into flames before hitting two large oak trees which caused it to break into three sections. One section was lodged against one of the oak trees, the cockpit section of the fuselage lodged on the Wallace Neel Road, and the tail section continued to skid past the cockpit and eventually came to rest on a house fronting Wallace Neel Road. The location of the cockpit section and the lack of connecting roads served to divide the operations into two sections. To complicate matters from a jurisdictional perspective, part of the wreckage was on city-owned property and part was outside of the city's jurisdiction in Mecklenburg County.

Fire and Rescue Operations

Because of the weather and near zero visibility at the time, the airport control tower did not know exactly what had happened to the plane other than they had lost it from radar. The first reports to the 911 emergency dispatch came from citizens who were traveling along Wallace Neel Road. These first reports did not indicate that the plane was a DC-9, therefore only two fire engine companies responded. The first two fire engine companies concentrated on extinguishing the fire and maintaining a foam blanket during rescue operations. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

The Crash of USAir Flight 1016: Emergency Preparedness
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.