Jessica Stockholder: Mitchell-Innes & Nash

By Burton, Johanna | Artforum International, November 2006 | Go to article overview

Jessica Stockholder: Mitchell-Innes & Nash


Burton, Johanna, Artforum International


A few years ago, Jessica Stockholder described herself in an interview as feeling like "a dinosaur" around her students, whom she characterized as generally more interested in ideas than in the visual per se. While this statement might seem to mark a too-strident divide between then and now when it comes to modes of production over the past twenty years, Stockholder's self-assessment is certainly correct on this count: Her own work really has started to show its age. As the artist's recent group exhibition at Mitchell-Innes & Nash revealed, she continues apace with a practice that stubbornly refuses updating. The works included here, while not entirely devoid of surprise, nonetheless bore the signature of Stockholder's earliest sculptural experiments.

Which is to say, on the one hand, that the artist's fondness for lumpen materials hasn't faded. It is also to point out that her predilections have achieved enough acceptance over the last couple of decades that her familiar stockpiles have come to look almost old-fashioned. This portrayal of Stockholder's most recent work as not quite current, it should be said, is meant less as critique and more as an article of curiosity. Indeed, the whiff of anachronism clinging to the eight discrete works assembled here delivered, counterintuitively, a breath of fresh air. In eschewing the ever-accelerating style cycle, the artist invariably called attention to it, with the effect that her roomful of sculptures exerted a peculiar aggression.

Peculiar because, in a sense, the work (all dated 2006) looked better behaved than ever. If there was ever a time when the artist's aesthetic caused offense, it has passed. And while she continues to produce large-scale installations, the offerings here were unapologetically gallery-oriented and therefore quite self-contained. "Studio works," as Stockholder calls them, these are pieces scaled for display in the home or museum with a minimum of fuss. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Jessica Stockholder: Mitchell-Innes & Nash
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.