Christiana Soulou: Galerie 3

By Cafopoulos, Catherine | Artforum International, November 2006 | Go to article overview

Christiana Soulou: Galerie 3


Cafopoulos, Catherine, Artforum International


Christiana Soulou has an extraordinary gift for drawing, her chosen vehicle of expression, and she reminds us of the inherent power of the line. Her unrestrained reverence for the medium is imparted to the viewer--and yet her lines are broken. They are outlines with gaps that are as important as the line itself; gaps that complete the drawings and render them exquisitely elusive. Handling her line with unmistakable care and delicacy lest in its wispy fragility it slip away and vanish, she demonstrates her unconditional exaltation of it. The very tenuousness of her line conveys her passion for drawing.

The subjects that populate Soulou's works float on the surface of the paper and yet, it would appear, they could very well exist without it. Theirs is a world of non-space in which gravity is absent: The figures, whether in a state of flux or of levitation, gently waft about in a world of their own, as for instance in She is sleeping, 2005, in which a porcelainlike nymph of a girl lies softly on a bed apparently suspended in space. The flowers and cherries sparsely scattered around her pillow seem to allude to yet another space--the private space of her dreams, serene and still. In other works, the figures are placed off-center, as in At the house of the mournful man ..., 2005, or in a diagonal arrangement that imbues them with a whimsical directional impetus. She draws on impassioned personal experiences succinctly coupled with poetic titles that transport one to fantastical worlds of the imagination and recall a utopian world of myths. Through the perfection of craft and her entrancing figurative vernacular, Soulou induces a curious encounter with the imaginary. …

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