Technology, Distance Education, and Honors

By Schlenker, Jon A. | Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council, Fall-Winter 2002 | Go to article overview

Technology, Distance Education, and Honors


Schlenker, Jon A., Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council


INTRODUCTION

Few people would deny the advancements that have occurred in educational technology in recent decades. Scarcely a generation has passed since educators have gone from 16-mm projectors, slide projectors, overhead projectors, and opaque projectors to video players, DVD players, computers, and power-point presentations in the classroom. Indeed, for many teachers these "modern" technologies have become "traditional" and indispensable classroom features.

This "educational technology revolution" has likewise been extended to the offering of honors courses in honors programs and honors colleges across the country. The preliminary results of a survey of member institutions of the National Collegiate Honors Council, conducted by the NCHC's Technology and Distance Education Committee during the spring semester 2002, indicated that of the 139 colleges and universities responding, 102 (73.4%) reported utilizing technology in the delivery of their honors courses.

Again, a preliminary review of the survey data showed that there is a wide range of technology employed in the delivery of honors courses: from the standard to the complex. Since the survey questions were open-ended, the responses were not specific enough to allow for solid conclusions. Nevertheless, the 102 honors programs/ honors colleges reporting the use of technology in the delivery of honors courses did identify several educational technologies as the most popular.

Forty-five of the 102 (44.1%) honors programs/colleges utilized personal computers, specifically PowerPoint, in presenting course content. The next popular technology involved web sites/web pages designed to include course syllabi and course materials (31 respondents or 30.4%). E-mail to communicate with course participants was listed by 30 schools (29.4%). Various other technologies were used to facilitate discussions about course topics: "Blackboard" (27 respondents or 26.5%); listserv (8 respondents or 7.8%); chat rooms (5 respondents or 4.9%).

Honors programs/colleges also employed the internet with on-line (internet-based) courses (12 respondents or 11.8%); courses via Web CT (10 respondents or 9.8%); and accessing the internet for course resources (15 respondents or 14.7%).

Other technologies included VCR, CD, and DVD players (29 respondents or 28.4%); interactive television (5 respondents or 4.9%); and document cameras (2 respondents or 2.0%) to deliver course materials. And four respondents (3.9%) identified their subscriptions to the NCHC/Phi Theta Kappa Satellite Seminar Series as a use of technology.

Finally, fifteen honors programs/colleges reported that multimedia or "smart" classrooms were available for their faculty to present courses. In these situations, a combination of educational technologies is available in the classroom. Typically, a "smart" classroom would include computers that are internet connected, personal computers, VCRs, DVD players, CD players, document camera, overhead projector, slide projector--or any combination of these.

TECHNOLOGY AND DISTANCE EDUCATION

Besides the application of educational technologies to deliver honors courses on campus, the possibility or necessity exists for some honors programs/colleges to offer their courses to students at a distance. The occurrence of distance education in higher education in the United States has increased markedly in the past fifteen years. About one-fourth of the accredited colleges and universities in the U.S. are presently providing some form of distance education to students, ranging from individual courses (credit or non-credit) to entire degrees (Connick, 1999). The Peterson's Guide to Distance Learning Programs listed nearly 900 accredited schools offering courses and programs in the U.S. and Canada.

The concept of "distance education" has historically had several meanings. Some people preferred the term "distance learning," which tended to focus on the end product ("learning") of distance education (Willis, 1993). …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Sign up now for a free, 1-day trial and receive full access to:

  • Questia's entire collection
  • Automatic bibliography creation
  • More helpful research tools like notes, citations, and highlights
  • A full archive of books and articles related to this one
  • Ad-free environment

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Technology, Distance Education, and Honors
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.