Clemson University

By Mack, Pam | Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council, Fall-Winter 2002 | Go to article overview

Clemson University


Mack, Pam, Journal of the National Collegiate Honors Council


While the honors program at Clemson University has not developed its own technology plan, the university's efforts have opened interesting opportunities. Most of our interdisciplinary honors seminars are taught in a smart classroom, with a computer that projects onto a screen, so Internet resources can easily be accessed. I've taught honors seminars there, such as one on "2001: The History of the Future," and use the computer projection to show web pages to the class. I am particularly fond of the Oxford English Dictionary on line, to which Clemson subscribes; looking up the definition of a word that has become important in a class discussion can be very illuminating. I'm looking forward, as soon as my teaching schedule allows, to teaching an interdisciplinary seminar on the impact of computers on society, which would be a laptop-enhanced course, requiring students to bring laptops to class and log into the network.

Clemson now requires laptops for students in engineering, physical sciences, business, and social sciences, and plans to do so for the remainder of the student body in a year or two. The process of revising courses to make use of student laptops goes slowly; this fall semester only three of the approximately 35 honors sections offered at the 100 and 200 level were laptop-enhanced and in the spring only two are. I taught one of the three last fall, a separate honors section of a course on "History, Technology, and Society," designed for freshmen engineers. …

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