President of Jacksonville's Museum of Science, History; She Had Been Battling Cancer since October and Had a Respiratory Infection

By Wells, Judy | The Florida Times Union, June 23, 2007 | Go to article overview

President of Jacksonville's Museum of Science, History; She Had Been Battling Cancer since October and Had a Respiratory Infection


Wells, Judy, The Florida Times Union


Byline: JUDY WELLS

Someone else will have to introduce Jacksonville's children to spiders and dinosaurs. Margo E. Dundon, president of the Museum of Science & History for 17 years, died Friday morning. She was 56.

Mrs. Dundon had fought lymphatic cancer since October, succumbing from complications due to a respiratory infection.

In addition to staging kid-pleasing exhibits, Mrs. Dundon led the institution through a $4.5 million renovation, the installation of $1.5 million worth of permanent exhibits and an $8 million capital campaign that ended in 2002.

"Margo was a great leader," Will Newton, president of the museum's board of directors, said in a statement released through the museum. "She was a wonderful representative for the museum and for Jacksonville. She will be sorely missed by everyone at MOSH."

Michael Oberg, the museum's vice president for 12 years, will continue to serve as acting president and chief executive officer, the statement said.

Most people who knew Mrs. Dundon will remember her for her humor, friendship, curiosity and positive attitude.

"People would ask her how long she'd been here and she would look at her watch," said Suzanne Perritt, who was on the committee that hired Mrs. Dundon.

"Even her e-mails -- she's been keeping us all posted from the hospital," Perritt said. "She used her humor about herself up until a month ago."

A brother remembered her as the smart, artistic older sister who looked after them.

"Margo's always been very curious, a student and a learner wanting to know more about the world," said William Buckeye, a United Methodist pastor in Cleveland. "She was a great big-sister."

He, too, spoke of her humor -- "I'm going to miss that laugh. She had the best laugh in the world" -- and of the reactions he received as he notified people of her passing. …

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