Integrating Academic Interventions into Small Group Counseling in Elementary School

By Steen, Sam; Kaffenberger, Carol J. | Professional School Counseling, June 2007 | Go to article overview

Integrating Academic Interventions into Small Group Counseling in Elementary School


Steen, Sam, Kaffenberger, Carol J., Professional School Counseling


Professional school counselors face the challenge of delivering guidance and counseling services to students while connecting to the educational mission of schools. This article is a summary and evaluation of a small group counseling program that targets academic issues while addressing personal/social issues with elementary-aged children. Results suggest that integrating academic interventions and group counseling improved students' behavior related to school achievement. Implications for school counselors and application of the ASCA National Model[R] are briefly discussed.

**********

Professional school counselors are challenged to efficiently and effectively provide guidance and counseling services to all students while responding to the current initiatives to address the achievement gap between poor students and students of color and their more advantaged peers (House & Hayes, 2002). Further, school reform has continued to encourage a more strategic focus on the importance of academic achievement for all students. The No Child Left Behind Act (U.S. Department of Education, 2001) requires that all states implement standards-based instruction and annually measure student achievement. The added pressure on schools and students to meet academic standards has affected school counseling programs.

The purpose of this article is to describe an elementary school counseling program that used small groups to help students increase learning behaviors (i.e., actions such as asking questions, completing assignments, and staying on task) and improve academic achievement, while addressing their personal/social concerns such as changing families, friendship, and/or anger management. The objectives of the groups centered on improving students' learning behaviors while including developmentally appropriate strategies to facilitate personal/social development. The ASCA National Model[R] (American School Counselor Association, 2005) was used as a framework for the development and delivery of the groups and for monitoring student success. Data were collected before, during, and after the groups documenting the impact of group counseling on the students' learning behaviors.

SMALL GROUP COUNSELING

The small group counseling program was designed by the school counselor as an efficient and effective way to provide services to a large number of students identified by their teachers and parents as having personal/social issues as well as academic difficulties. Small group counseling is part of the delivery system of the ASCA National Model and is an effective responsive service offered by school counselors to meet the personal/social and academic needs of all students (Cook & Kaffenberger, 2003). Topics for small counseling groups were developed in conjunction with teachers, administrators, and parents. School counselors, in many instances, consult with parents or guardians, school personnel, and other identified parties when developing plans and strategies for promoting student development (ASCA, 2005). In the case of the small counseling groups described in this article, the school counselor consulted with teachers and parents to understand their perceptions of the personal/social and academic needs of the students in the school. Small groups were offered that were consistent with the expressed needs of parents and teachers. ASCA's National Standards for School Counseling Programs provided the specific academic and personal/social objectives for the groups (ASCA, 2005).

The goal of the groups described in this article, therefore, was twofold: to address the students' personal/social needs, and to address their academic needs. Demonstrating the impact that school counselors have on student success is imperative as a new era of accountability exists and as school counselors continue to strengthen and define their roles.

THE SMALL GROUP COUNSELING PROGRAM

School Demographics

This small group counseling program was developed for the students attending a suburban elementary school located in Northern Virginia. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this article

This article has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this article

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited article

Integrating Academic Interventions into Small Group Counseling in Elementary School
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.