Editorial

By Indraguru, Bhavatosh | Creative Forum, January-June 2007 | Go to article overview

Editorial


Indraguru, Bhavatosh, Creative Forum


The strength of an artistic situation has it manifestation in the methods of valuation, comprehension, and assessment. The modes and varieties of comprehension impose a necessity to have a perfect organization and an equally well reception through the object and the medium. It means that a work of art must create a set of response to the medium and the object through which it is purported to be carried on. In this regard one can understand how a work of art has an applicability for the sake of merits that are available in the form of benefits of an internal and external environments. This stretch and immensity of artistic form, manner, method and mode of organization of contents, constructs and the categories has been at the heart of Indian and Western literary/theoretical inquiries. In Indian tradition an artistic situation comes to be interpreted and organized through content assertion and category construction. For that matter there are two broader stages through which we can arrive at this understanding. In the first place, there are primary models in the form of Sabda, Varna, Pada and Vakya and secondly there are also primary categories like Bhava, Sthayi Bhava, Vibhava, Anubhava and Sancari Bhavas. Through the terms of synthesis, convergence, association, correlation, proposition and cognition presented by each of the above, we have the creation of an artistic situation that tends to be genuine and ideal. On the other hand, in the Western tradition the possibility of valuing and comprehending the intensity of an artistic formation is limited and restricted to the particular scope of a general situation hence the theories and theoreticians right from Aristotle, Longinus, Quintilian, Horace, Coleridge, Eliot, Richards, Sassurre, Barthes, Jakobson, Lacan and Derrida have insisted that the function of an artistic situation must be assessed and determined through primordial forms obtained in the language and the meaning. …

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