Conference: Community Colleges May Be Best Hope to Close Achievement Gap: Minority, Low-Income Students Continue to Be Left Behind Academically

By Dodson, Angela P. | Diverse Issues in Higher Education, June 14, 2007 | Go to article overview

Conference: Community Colleges May Be Best Hope to Close Achievement Gap: Minority, Low-Income Students Continue to Be Left Behind Academically


Dodson, Angela P., Diverse Issues in Higher Education


PRINCETON, NJ.

Community colleges are the "last, best hope" for closing the achievement gap for socioeconomically disadvantaged students, said the president of the Educational Testing Service during a two-day conference in Princeton, N.J. But community colleges will need help to meet the challenge.

Last month, ETS and the American Association of Community Colleges hosted "Addressing Achievement Gaps: How Community Colleges Contribute to Equity in Education and the Workforce," which attracted nearly 200 participants from colleges, foundations and organizations across the nation.

According to data from the National Assessment of Educational Progress, reading scores for 17-year-olds narrowed dramatically for Black and Hispanic students between 1975 and 1988. Dora 1990 to 1999, however, gaps in reading and mathematics remained constant or grew slightly, and little progress has been seen since. More alarmingly, Black and Hispanic students' skills in English, math and science are about four years behind those of White students, according to the NAEP data, also known as the Nation's Report Card.

Theories on why the gaps continue to persist despite economic and civil rights gains for racial and ethnic minorities range from the low expectations of educators to watered-down academic offerings to a lack of interest by the students and their families in their schooling. The ETS conference, like recent public initiatives including the No Child Left Behind Act, focused on eradicating the gap, no matter the causes.

Dr. Michael Nettles, senior vice president of ETS' Center for Policy Evaluation and Research, noted that this is the organization's seventh conference on the issue of imbalanced outcomes in education, but it is the first to focus on it at the postsecondary level.

Nettles moderated an opening discussion between Kurt M. Landgraf, the president and CEO of ETS, and Dr. George Boggs, president and CEO of the American Association of Community Colleges.

"We need to realize that the United States is in a serious holding pattern relative to educational attainment by its citizens," Landgraf told the educators. "We are leaving behind a larger and larger cohort of our students. We must do something, and frankly, the community colleges may be our very last, best hope, because you are dealing with the majority of the students that we have traditionally left behind. …

The rest of this article is only available to active members of Questia

Already a member? Log in now.

Notes for this article

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this article

Cited article

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited article

Conference: Community Colleges May Be Best Hope to Close Achievement Gap: Minority, Low-Income Students Continue to Be Left Behind Academically
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this article

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this article
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.